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Clients’ experiences of housing adaptations: a longitudinal mixed-methods study.

Pettersson, Cecilia LU ; Löfqvist, Charlotte LU and Malmgren Fänge, Agneta LU (2012) In Disability and Rehabilitation 34(20). p.1706-1715
Abstract
Purpose: To explore clients' experience of the housing adaptations (HAs) over time in relation to housing and health.



Method: A multiple longitudinal case study, employing an embedded mixed-method design was used. Four participants were included and data from semi-structured interviews were combined with data from structured survey assessments.



Results: HA made it possible to maintain valuable roles and activities, to continue to live in the participants' own homes and to take part in the society. The participants strived for autonomy and control, and in order to do so they needed different kinds of support, in terms of HA and mobility devices as well as support from professionals. HA also challenged... (More)
Purpose: To explore clients' experience of the housing adaptations (HAs) over time in relation to housing and health.



Method: A multiple longitudinal case study, employing an embedded mixed-method design was used. Four participants were included and data from semi-structured interviews were combined with data from structured survey assessments.



Results: HA made it possible to maintain valuable roles and activities, to continue to live in the participants' own homes and to take part in the society. The participants strived for autonomy and control, and in order to do so they needed different kinds of support, in terms of HA and mobility devices as well as support from professionals. HA also challenged the participants' routines and habits, as well as their perception about how an appealing HA aesthetically. Thus, the decision to apply for a HA was not always straightforward. Instead, the participants were constantly engaged in negotiations with themselves, concerning benefits and drawbacks of different decisions.



Conclusions: HAs involve complex person-environment-activity (P-E-A) transactions, and enhance clients' activity and independence in spite of functional decline. The knowledge generated is important in order to improve individual HA, as well as improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the intervention. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Disability and Rehabilitation
volume
34
issue
20
pages
1706 - 1715
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • pmid:22380652
  • wos:000307226400005
  • scopus:84867188600
ISSN
0963-8288
DOI
10.3109/09638288.2012.660596
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c94d2593-c10d-48a7-9892-bcf03ab1beea (old id 2432356)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22380652?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-04-03 07:55:34
date last changed
2017-07-09 03:09:09
@article{c94d2593-c10d-48a7-9892-bcf03ab1beea,
  abstract     = {Purpose: To explore clients' experience of the housing adaptations (HAs) over time in relation to housing and health. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Method: A multiple longitudinal case study, employing an embedded mixed-method design was used. Four participants were included and data from semi-structured interviews were combined with data from structured survey assessments. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: HA made it possible to maintain valuable roles and activities, to continue to live in the participants' own homes and to take part in the society. The participants strived for autonomy and control, and in order to do so they needed different kinds of support, in terms of HA and mobility devices as well as support from professionals. HA also challenged the participants' routines and habits, as well as their perception about how an appealing HA aesthetically. Thus, the decision to apply for a HA was not always straightforward. Instead, the participants were constantly engaged in negotiations with themselves, concerning benefits and drawbacks of different decisions. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions: HAs involve complex person-environment-activity (P-E-A) transactions, and enhance clients' activity and independence in spite of functional decline. The knowledge generated is important in order to improve individual HA, as well as improving the efficiency and effectiveness of the intervention.},
  author       = {Pettersson, Cecilia and Löfqvist, Charlotte and Malmgren Fänge, Agneta},
  issn         = {0963-8288},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {20},
  pages        = {1706--1715},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Disability and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Clients’ experiences of housing adaptations: a longitudinal mixed-methods study.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/09638288.2012.660596},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2012},
}