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Long-term benefits of progressive resistance training in chronic stroke: A 4-year follow-up.

Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt LU ; Lexell, Jan LU and Brogårdh, Christina LU (2012) In Journal of rehabilitation medicine : official journal of the UEMS European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 44(3). p.218-221
Abstract
OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the long-term benefits of progressive resistance training in chronic stroke.



DESIGN:

A 4-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training.



SUBJECTS:

Eighteen women and men (mean age 66 (standard deviation 4) from the original group of 24 post-stroke participants.



METHODS:

The training group (n = 11) had participated in supervised progressive resistance training of the knee extensors and flexors (80% of maximum) twice weekly for 10 weeks, whereas the control group (n = 7) had continued their usual daily activities. Muscle strength was evaluated isotonically and isokinetically (60º/s; Biodex),... (More)
OBJECTIVES:

To evaluate the long-term benefits of progressive resistance training in chronic stroke.



DESIGN:

A 4-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training.



SUBJECTS:

Eighteen women and men (mean age 66 (standard deviation 4) from the original group of 24 post-stroke participants.



METHODS:

The training group (n = 11) had participated in supervised progressive resistance training of the knee extensors and flexors (80% of maximum) twice weekly for 10 weeks, whereas the control group (n = 7) had continued their usual daily activities. Muscle strength was evaluated isotonically and isokinetically (60º/s; Biodex), muscle tone with the Modified Ashworth Scale, gait performance by the Timed Up and Go test, the Fast Gait Speed test and 6-Minute Walk test, and perceived participation with the Stroke Impact Scale (Participation domain).



RESULTS:

Four years after the intervention, the improvements in muscle strength in the training group were maintained, and there was no reduction in strength in the control group. Compared with baseline there were still significant between-group differences for both isotonic and isokinetic strength. No significant between-group differences were found in muscle tone, gait performance or perceived participation.



CONCLUSION:

The results indicate that there is a long-term benefit of progressive resistance training in chronic stroke. This implies that progressive resistance training could be an effective training method to improve and maintain muscle strength in a long-term perspective. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of rehabilitation medicine : official journal of the UEMS European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
volume
44
issue
3
pages
218 - 221
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000305492600005
  • pmid:22366878
  • scopus:84857839161
ISSN
1651-2081
DOI
10.2340/16501977-0936
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
46632036-224e-4859-ad97-0b9b4f1f81b4 (old id 2432504)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22366878?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-04-02 11:14:13
date last changed
2017-07-02 04:11:39
@article{46632036-224e-4859-ad97-0b9b4f1f81b4,
  abstract     = {OBJECTIVES:<br/><br>
To evaluate the long-term benefits of progressive resistance training in chronic stroke.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
DESIGN:<br/><br>
A 4-year follow-up of a randomized controlled trial of progressive resistance training.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
SUBJECTS:<br/><br>
Eighteen women and men (mean age 66 (standard deviation 4) from the original group of 24 post-stroke participants.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS:<br/><br>
The training group (n = 11) had participated in supervised progressive resistance training of the knee extensors and flexors (80% of maximum) twice weekly for 10 weeks, whereas the control group (n = 7) had continued their usual daily activities. Muscle strength was evaluated isotonically and isokinetically (60º/s; Biodex), muscle tone with the Modified Ashworth Scale, gait performance by the Timed Up and Go test, the Fast Gait Speed test and 6-Minute Walk test, and perceived participation with the Stroke Impact Scale (Participation domain).<br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS:<br/><br>
Four years after the intervention, the improvements in muscle strength in the training group were maintained, and there was no reduction in strength in the control group. Compared with baseline there were still significant between-group differences for both isotonic and isokinetic strength. No significant between-group differences were found in muscle tone, gait performance or perceived participation.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSION:<br/><br>
The results indicate that there is a long-term benefit of progressive resistance training in chronic stroke. This implies that progressive resistance training could be an effective training method to improve and maintain muscle strength in a long-term perspective.},
  author       = {Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt and Lexell, Jan and Brogårdh, Christina},
  issn         = {1651-2081},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {218--221},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Journal of rehabilitation medicine : official journal of the UEMS European Board of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine},
  title        = {Long-term benefits of progressive resistance training in chronic stroke: A 4-year follow-up.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2340/16501977-0936},
  volume       = {44},
  year         = {2012},
}