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Detecting ticks on light versus dark clothing

Stjernberg, Louise LU and Berglund, Johan LU (2005) In Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases 37(5). p.361-364
Abstract
It is a common belief that ticks are more visible and easier to detect on light clothing in comparison with dark clothing. We studied which of the clothing, light or dark, had the least attractive effect on Ixodes ricinus, thus minimizing exposure and thereby in theory helping to prevent tick-borne diseases in humans. 10 participants, exposed by walking in tick endemic areas, wore alternately light and dark clothing before every new exposure. Nymphal and adult ticks on the clothing were collected and counted. In total, 886 nymphal ticks were collected. The overall mean in found ticks between both groups differed significantly, with 20.8 more ticks per person on light clothing. All participants had more ticks on light clothing in all... (More)
It is a common belief that ticks are more visible and easier to detect on light clothing in comparison with dark clothing. We studied which of the clothing, light or dark, had the least attractive effect on Ixodes ricinus, thus minimizing exposure and thereby in theory helping to prevent tick-borne diseases in humans. 10 participants, exposed by walking in tick endemic areas, wore alternately light and dark clothing before every new exposure. Nymphal and adult ticks on the clothing were collected and counted. In total, 886 nymphal ticks were collected. The overall mean in found ticks between both groups differed significantly, with 20.8 more ticks per person on light clothing. All participants had more ticks on light clothing in all periods of exposure. Dark clothing seems to attract fewer ticks. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases
volume
37
issue
5
pages
361 - 364
publisher
Informa Healthcare
external identifiers
  • wos:000228667700007
  • pmid:16051573
  • scopus:18844420309
ISSN
1651-1980
DOI
10.1080/00365540410021216
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
7af3b57f-36b4-4273-bf12-1d47e7ab01b6 (old id 243875)
date added to LUP
2007-08-10 09:38:51
date last changed
2017-04-23 04:22:58
@article{7af3b57f-36b4-4273-bf12-1d47e7ab01b6,
  abstract     = {It is a common belief that ticks are more visible and easier to detect on light clothing in comparison with dark clothing. We studied which of the clothing, light or dark, had the least attractive effect on Ixodes ricinus, thus minimizing exposure and thereby in theory helping to prevent tick-borne diseases in humans. 10 participants, exposed by walking in tick endemic areas, wore alternately light and dark clothing before every new exposure. Nymphal and adult ticks on the clothing were collected and counted. In total, 886 nymphal ticks were collected. The overall mean in found ticks between both groups differed significantly, with 20.8 more ticks per person on light clothing. All participants had more ticks on light clothing in all periods of exposure. Dark clothing seems to attract fewer ticks.},
  author       = {Stjernberg, Louise and Berglund, Johan},
  issn         = {1651-1980},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {361--364},
  publisher    = {Informa Healthcare},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases},
  title        = {Detecting ticks on light versus dark clothing},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00365540410021216},
  volume       = {37},
  year         = {2005},
}