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Habitat structure and prey aggregation determine the functional response in a soil predator-prey interaction

Vucic-Pestic, Oliver; Birkhofer, Klaus LU ; Rall, Björn C.; Scheu, Stefan and Brose, Ulrich (2010) In Pedobiologia 53(5). p.307-312
Abstract
Functionalresponses describe the per capita consumption rates of predators depending on prey density, which quantifies the energy transfer between trophic levels. We studied a typical interaction of the litter–soil systems between hunting spiders (Pardosa lugubris; Araneae: Lycosidae) and springtails (Heteromurus nitidus; Collembola: Entomobryidae) at varying habitatstructure, i.e. with moss vs. without moss. We found a hyperbolic increase in consumption (functionalresponse type II) in the treatment without habitatstructure that was converted into a roller-coaster (or dome-shaped in a broad sense) functionalresponse in treatments with habitatstructure. Additional experiments suggest that the reduced per capita consumption rates at high... (More)
Functionalresponses describe the per capita consumption rates of predators depending on prey density, which quantifies the energy transfer between trophic levels. We studied a typical interaction of the litter–soil systems between hunting spiders (Pardosa lugubris; Araneae: Lycosidae) and springtails (Heteromurus nitidus; Collembola: Entomobryidae) at varying habitatstructure, i.e. with moss vs. without moss. We found a hyperbolic increase in consumption (functionalresponse type II) in the treatment without habitatstructure that was converted into a roller-coaster (or dome-shaped in a broad sense) functionalresponse in treatments with habitatstructure. Additional experiments suggest that the reduced per capita consumption rates at high prey densities may be explained by aggregative defence behaviour of the springtails. Experimentally, this behaviour was induced by the presence of habitatstructure. We analyzed the net-energy gain of this predator–preyinteraction by comparing the predator’s metabolic energy loss to its energy gain by consumption. In treatments with habitatstructure, the net-energy gain of the predator was limited at intermediate prey densities where preyaggregation reduced the consumption rates. Our results stress the importance of habitatstructure and prey behaviour in shaping the functionalresponse in a typical soil–litter predator–preyinteraction. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Type IV functional response, Dome-shaped functional response, Metabolic rate, Swarming effect, Interaction strength
in
Pedobiologia
volume
53
issue
5
pages
307 - 312
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:77955570048
ISSN
1873-1511
DOI
10.1016/j.pedobi.2010.02.003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
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5eb99c5e-6b4d-4473-9445-4376ee071f07 (old id 2440422)
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http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?eid=2-s2.0-77955570048&partnerID=40&md5=c1c86de2930df6cc1a5a1c25ca282fe5
date added to LUP
2012-06-18 15:34:57
date last changed
2018-07-08 03:00:19
@article{5eb99c5e-6b4d-4473-9445-4376ee071f07,
  abstract     = {Functionalresponses describe the per capita consumption rates of predators depending on prey density, which quantifies the energy transfer between trophic levels. We studied a typical interaction of the litter–soil systems between hunting spiders (Pardosa lugubris; Araneae: Lycosidae) and springtails (Heteromurus nitidus; Collembola: Entomobryidae) at varying habitatstructure, i.e. with moss vs. without moss. We found a hyperbolic increase in consumption (functionalresponse type II) in the treatment without habitatstructure that was converted into a roller-coaster (or dome-shaped in a broad sense) functionalresponse in treatments with habitatstructure. Additional experiments suggest that the reduced per capita consumption rates at high prey densities may be explained by aggregative defence behaviour of the springtails. Experimentally, this behaviour was induced by the presence of habitatstructure. We analyzed the net-energy gain of this predator–preyinteraction by comparing the predator’s metabolic energy loss to its energy gain by consumption. In treatments with habitatstructure, the net-energy gain of the predator was limited at intermediate prey densities where preyaggregation reduced the consumption rates. Our results stress the importance of habitatstructure and prey behaviour in shaping the functionalresponse in a typical soil–litter predator–preyinteraction.},
  author       = {Vucic-Pestic, Oliver and Birkhofer, Klaus and Rall, Björn C. and Scheu, Stefan and Brose, Ulrich},
  issn         = {1873-1511},
  keyword      = {Type IV functional response,Dome-shaped functional response,Metabolic rate,Swarming effect,Interaction strength},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {307--312},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Pedobiologia},
  title        = {Habitat structure and prey aggregation determine the functional response in a soil predator-prey interaction},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pedobi.2010.02.003},
  volume       = {53},
  year         = {2010},
}