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Biomass or growth? How to measure soil food webs to understand structure and function

Rousk, Johannes LU (2016) In Soil Biology and Biochemistry 102. p.45-47
Abstract

Food web links reflect the feeding rate of organisms and should thus capture the biomass production rate of the consumer. This information is rarely available for detrital food webs and has instead been inferred from biomass estimates to construct quantitative detrital food webs. Published method comparisons between biomass, growth and mineralisation show that microbial biomass is a poor predictor for process rates. This calls into question the current practise of parameterising soil detrital food webs. Emerging methods to estimate microbial growth rates and growth efficiencies are promising new avenues. If quantitative assessments of detrital food webs are revised by incorporating information that reflects the feeding rates of... (More)

Food web links reflect the feeding rate of organisms and should thus capture the biomass production rate of the consumer. This information is rarely available for detrital food webs and has instead been inferred from biomass estimates to construct quantitative detrital food webs. Published method comparisons between biomass, growth and mineralisation show that microbial biomass is a poor predictor for process rates. This calls into question the current practise of parameterising soil detrital food webs. Emerging methods to estimate microbial growth rates and growth efficiencies are promising new avenues. If quantitative assessments of detrital food webs are revised by incorporating information that reflects the feeding rates of organisms, they could represent a powerful conceptual tool to investigate fundamental ecological theory, including how stability links to complexity and how function depends on the structure of whole food webs.

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Bacteria and fungi, Biogeochemistry, Food chain, Food web interactions, Soil fauna, Trophic interaction
in
Soil Biology and Biochemistry
volume
102
pages
3 pages
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • scopus:84991096044
  • wos:000385472700012
ISSN
0038-0717
DOI
10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.07.001
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
244cb1f7-7391-42f8-8eb5-c6fe2cd4ea0d
date added to LUP
2016-10-28 10:08:22
date last changed
2017-10-01 05:25:01
@article{244cb1f7-7391-42f8-8eb5-c6fe2cd4ea0d,
  abstract     = {<p>Food web links reflect the feeding rate of organisms and should thus capture the biomass production rate of the consumer. This information is rarely available for detrital food webs and has instead been inferred from biomass estimates to construct quantitative detrital food webs. Published method comparisons between biomass, growth and mineralisation show that microbial biomass is a poor predictor for process rates. This calls into question the current practise of parameterising soil detrital food webs. Emerging methods to estimate microbial growth rates and growth efficiencies are promising new avenues. If quantitative assessments of detrital food webs are revised by incorporating information that reflects the feeding rates of organisms, they could represent a powerful conceptual tool to investigate fundamental ecological theory, including how stability links to complexity and how function depends on the structure of whole food webs.</p>},
  author       = {Rousk, Johannes},
  issn         = {0038-0717},
  keyword      = {Bacteria and fungi,Biogeochemistry,Food chain,Food web interactions,Soil fauna,Trophic interaction},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {11},
  pages        = {45--47},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Soil Biology and Biochemistry},
  title        = {Biomass or growth? How to measure soil food webs to understand structure and function},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2016.07.001},
  volume       = {102},
  year         = {2016},
}