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Researcher, Traveller, Narrator : Studies in Pausanias' Periegesis

Akujärvi, Johanna LU (2005) In Studia Graeca et Latina Lundensia 12.
Abstract
This is a study of the second century AD literary work 'Periegesis Hellados', i.e. description of, or guide to, Greece, written by the otherwise unknown author Pausanias. This is a purely textual study with the whole of the Periegesis as its object. It falls into two parts.



In part one we study the frame narrative. The current views on the 'theoremata' and 'logoi' in the Periegesis is reconsidered. The aim is to challenge the notion that the 'theoremata' provide the organisatory backbone for the Periegesis. It is instead argued that both the 'theoremata' and the 'logoi' are components embedded within the frame narrative which tells about the research and to a lesser degree the travel undertaken by Ego. This frame... (More)
This is a study of the second century AD literary work 'Periegesis Hellados', i.e. description of, or guide to, Greece, written by the otherwise unknown author Pausanias. This is a purely textual study with the whole of the Periegesis as its object. It falls into two parts.



In part one we study the frame narrative. The current views on the 'theoremata' and 'logoi' in the Periegesis is reconsidered. The aim is to challenge the notion that the 'theoremata' provide the organisatory backbone for the Periegesis. It is instead argued that both the 'theoremata' and the 'logoi' are components embedded within the frame narrative which tells about the research and to a lesser degree the travel undertaken by Ego. This frame narrative is the organisatory backbone of the Periegesis. The study of the frame is focussed on its most prominent feature, viz. Ego. Apart from an exploration of the various functions and different roles in which Ego appears, part one also contains a study of the anonymous, shadow-like, indefinite, almost impersonal 'you' whom the narrator frequently introduces in the act of travelling in the frame narrative, together with a discussion on the effects of it and possible reasons for why it is done.



Part two is devoted to the study of a fraction of the multifarious narratives embedded in the frame narrative, viz. a selection of historical narratives. First, the narrator's control in selecting subject matter for the Periegesis and disposing it throughout the work is reviewed. Next, the study is focussed on the three interrelated themes with the common denominator Greeks at war. The themes are defined according to against whom the Greeks waged their wars: Greeks against Greeks, Greeks against others, and Greeks and Romans. These three themes are considered important for the understanding of Pausanias' attitude towards the history of Greece and the present situation under which he was living. The aim with our study is to challenge the current notions regarding these themes. First, we argue that the Periegesis does not give us access to the opinions, views or notions of its author on these or any other subject matters; what we can hope to discern is the idea or image of what the narrator conveyes to the readers through his presentation of the subject matters. Secondly, we argue that the narrator's presentation of the Greek past does not justify the current interpretation. Specifically, our aim is to show that, according to the Periegesis, war between Greeks was a normal state of things in the past, judgement is not to be passed on Greek communities according to whether or not they fought outsiders in the past, and it is doubtful whether Greek freedom would be preferable to the stability of the Roman government. (Less)
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author
opponent
  • Professor Hägg, Tomas, Universitetet i Bergen
organization
publishing date
type
Thesis
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Greek history (warfare in, Panhellenism, Second Sophistic, second person narrative, homodiegetic narrative, narrator, Pausanias, Periegesis, and reception of), Greek literature, Grekisk litteratur
in
Studia Graeca et Latina Lundensia
volume
12
pages
314 pages
publisher
Almqvist & Wiksell International
defense location
Humanisthusets hörsal, SOL-centrum, Helgonabacken 12, Lund
defense date
2005-12-03 10:15
ISSN
1100-7931
ISBN
91-22-02134-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
ec726e6b-5103-4089-a2ae-abe47435eb82 (old id 24669)
date added to LUP
2007-06-01 08:02:31
date last changed
2016-09-19 08:44:58
@phdthesis{ec726e6b-5103-4089-a2ae-abe47435eb82,
  abstract     = {This is a study of the second century AD literary work 'Periegesis Hellados', i.e. description of, or guide to, Greece, written by the otherwise unknown author Pausanias. This is a purely textual study with the whole of the Periegesis as its object. It falls into two parts.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
In part one we study the frame narrative. The current views on the 'theoremata' and 'logoi' in the Periegesis is reconsidered. The aim is to challenge the notion that the 'theoremata' provide the organisatory backbone for the Periegesis. It is instead argued that both the 'theoremata' and the 'logoi' are components embedded within the frame narrative which tells about the research and to a lesser degree the travel undertaken by Ego. This frame narrative is the organisatory backbone of the Periegesis. The study of the frame is focussed on its most prominent feature, viz. Ego. Apart from an exploration of the various functions and different roles in which Ego appears, part one also contains a study of the anonymous, shadow-like, indefinite, almost impersonal 'you' whom the narrator frequently introduces in the act of travelling in the frame narrative, together with a discussion on the effects of it and possible reasons for why it is done.<br/><br>
<br/><br>
Part two is devoted to the study of a fraction of the multifarious narratives embedded in the frame narrative, viz. a selection of historical narratives. First, the narrator's control in selecting subject matter for the Periegesis and disposing it throughout the work is reviewed. Next, the study is focussed on the three interrelated themes with the common denominator Greeks at war. The themes are defined according to against whom the Greeks waged their wars: Greeks against Greeks, Greeks against others, and Greeks and Romans. These three themes are considered important for the understanding of Pausanias' attitude towards the history of Greece and the present situation under which he was living. The aim with our study is to challenge the current notions regarding these themes. First, we argue that the Periegesis does not give us access to the opinions, views or notions of its author on these or any other subject matters; what we can hope to discern is the idea or image of what the narrator conveyes to the readers through his presentation of the subject matters. Secondly, we argue that the narrator's presentation of the Greek past does not justify the current interpretation. Specifically, our aim is to show that, according to the Periegesis, war between Greeks was a normal state of things in the past, judgement is not to be passed on Greek communities according to whether or not they fought outsiders in the past, and it is doubtful whether Greek freedom would be preferable to the stability of the Roman government.},
  author       = {Akujärvi, Johanna},
  isbn         = {91-22-02134-5},
  issn         = {1100-7931},
  keyword      = {Greek history (warfare in,Panhellenism,Second Sophistic,second person narrative,homodiegetic narrative,narrator,Pausanias,Periegesis,and reception of),Greek literature,Grekisk litteratur},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {314},
  publisher    = {Almqvist & Wiksell International},
  school       = {Lund University},
  series       = {Studia Graeca et Latina Lundensia},
  title        = {Researcher, Traveller, Narrator : Studies in Pausanias' Periegesis},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2005},
}