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Bumblebee colonies produce larger foragers in complex landscapes

Persson, Anna LU and Smith, Henrik LU (2011) In Basic and Applied Ecology 12(8). p.695-702
Abstract
The negative effect of agricultural intensification on bumblebee populations is thought to partly be caused by loss of food plants, for example because of increased field size and concomitant loss of non-crop field borders and their nectar and pollen plants. Earlier studies have focused on how loss of foraging resources affects colony growth and thereby abundance of workers and sexual reproduction. By comparing bumblebees in agricultural landscapes of different complexity in Southern Sweden, we here demonstrate that also the adult size of bumblebee foragers is significantly related to the availability of foraging resources. This effect was independent of both species identity and foraging habitat type. This suggests a shortage of flower... (More)
The negative effect of agricultural intensification on bumblebee populations is thought to partly be caused by loss of food plants, for example because of increased field size and concomitant loss of non-crop field borders and their nectar and pollen plants. Earlier studies have focused on how loss of foraging resources affects colony growth and thereby abundance of workers and sexual reproduction. By comparing bumblebees in agricultural landscapes of different complexity in Southern Sweden, we here demonstrate that also the adult size of bumblebee foragers is significantly related to the availability of foraging resources. This effect was independent of both species identity and foraging habitat type. This suggests a shortage of flower resources in landscapes of lower complexity, which may also affect the reproductive success of colonies negatively. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
MFC, Landscape ecology, Agriculture, Forager size, Workers, Bombus spp.
in
Basic and Applied Ecology
volume
12
issue
8
pages
695 - 702
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000299187500006
  • scopus:82255179227
ISSN
1618-0089
DOI
10.1016/j.baae.2011.10.002
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6bae616f-26f5-41a9-82c4-95f860a159ff (old id 2494315)
date added to LUP
2012-06-04 14:20:16
date last changed
2017-05-14 03:11:49
@article{6bae616f-26f5-41a9-82c4-95f860a159ff,
  abstract     = {The negative effect of agricultural intensification on bumblebee populations is thought to partly be caused by loss of food plants, for example because of increased field size and concomitant loss of non-crop field borders and their nectar and pollen plants. Earlier studies have focused on how loss of foraging resources affects colony growth and thereby abundance of workers and sexual reproduction. By comparing bumblebees in agricultural landscapes of different complexity in Southern Sweden, we here demonstrate that also the adult size of bumblebee foragers is significantly related to the availability of foraging resources. This effect was independent of both species identity and foraging habitat type. This suggests a shortage of flower resources in landscapes of lower complexity, which may also affect the reproductive success of colonies negatively.},
  author       = {Persson, Anna and Smith, Henrik},
  issn         = {1618-0089},
  keyword      = {MFC,Landscape ecology,Agriculture,Forager size,Workers,Bombus spp.},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {695--702},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Basic and Applied Ecology},
  title        = {Bumblebee colonies produce larger foragers in complex landscapes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2011.10.002},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2011},
}