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Changes in attitudes, knowledge and hormone replacement therapy use: a comparative study in two random samples with 6-year interval

Thunell, Louise LU ; Stadberg, E; Milsom, I and Mattsson, L A (2005) In Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 84(4). p.395-401
Abstract
Objectives. To study changes in: (i) the prevalence of hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) and (ii) women's attitudes and knowledge about the climacteric. Design. Cross-sectional comparison was performed on two populations of women both aged 46-62 years and resident in the same urban Swedish population over a period of 6 years. Materials and Methods. In 1992, a random sample of 5990 women, from five birth cohorts, 46, 50, 54, 58, and 62 years in the city of Goteborg, were assessed using a postal questionnaire technique. In 1998, the same technique was used and a similar questionnaire was sent to another cohort of women (n = 5411) of the same ages, resident in the city of Goteborg. The overall response rate was 76%. Information was obtained... (More)
Objectives. To study changes in: (i) the prevalence of hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) and (ii) women's attitudes and knowledge about the climacteric. Design. Cross-sectional comparison was performed on two populations of women both aged 46-62 years and resident in the same urban Swedish population over a period of 6 years. Materials and Methods. In 1992, a random sample of 5990 women, from five birth cohorts, 46, 50, 54, 58, and 62 years in the city of Goteborg, were assessed using a postal questionnaire technique. In 1998, the same technique was used and a similar questionnaire was sent to another cohort of women (n = 5411) of the same ages, resident in the city of Goteborg. The overall response rate was 76%. Information was obtained regarding climacteric symptoms, HRT use, and attitudes and knowledge. Results. The prevalence of HRT use with medium-potency estrogens had increased from 13% (1992) to 31% (1998). The highest prevalence was reported in women 54 years of age (46%). The most common reasons why women started HRT were: hot flushes and sweats, depression/irritability, sleeping disturbances, and vaginal dryness. Forty-four percent of the women in this study were prepared to consider extended HRT if the treatment was free from withdrawal bleedings (35%, 1992). Eighty percent believed that the risk of osteoporosis decreased during HRT use (61%, 1992) and 68% thought that the risk of breast cancer increased (58%, 1992). Conclusion. A marked increase in the use of HRT was reported between 1992 and 1998. Women's attitudes to HRT were more positive in 1998 compared to 1992. Knowledge about HRT among women had increased during the same 6-year period. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
hormone-replacement therapy, attitudes, cross-sectional study, menopause, knowledge
in
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
volume
84
issue
4
pages
395 - 401
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000227589000016
  • pmid:15762973
  • scopus:16444380847
ISSN
1600-0412
DOI
10.1111/j.0001-6349.2005.00725.x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
ca8efa62-efc1-4578-87fc-c0657c0dadfa (old id 250409)
date added to LUP
2007-08-08 09:49:18
date last changed
2017-01-01 06:49:19
@article{ca8efa62-efc1-4578-87fc-c0657c0dadfa,
  abstract     = {Objectives. To study changes in: (i) the prevalence of hormone-replacement therapy (HRT) and (ii) women's attitudes and knowledge about the climacteric. Design. Cross-sectional comparison was performed on two populations of women both aged 46-62 years and resident in the same urban Swedish population over a period of 6 years. Materials and Methods. In 1992, a random sample of 5990 women, from five birth cohorts, 46, 50, 54, 58, and 62 years in the city of Goteborg, were assessed using a postal questionnaire technique. In 1998, the same technique was used and a similar questionnaire was sent to another cohort of women (n = 5411) of the same ages, resident in the city of Goteborg. The overall response rate was 76%. Information was obtained regarding climacteric symptoms, HRT use, and attitudes and knowledge. Results. The prevalence of HRT use with medium-potency estrogens had increased from 13% (1992) to 31% (1998). The highest prevalence was reported in women 54 years of age (46%). The most common reasons why women started HRT were: hot flushes and sweats, depression/irritability, sleeping disturbances, and vaginal dryness. Forty-four percent of the women in this study were prepared to consider extended HRT if the treatment was free from withdrawal bleedings (35%, 1992). Eighty percent believed that the risk of osteoporosis decreased during HRT use (61%, 1992) and 68% thought that the risk of breast cancer increased (58%, 1992). Conclusion. A marked increase in the use of HRT was reported between 1992 and 1998. Women's attitudes to HRT were more positive in 1998 compared to 1992. Knowledge about HRT among women had increased during the same 6-year period.},
  author       = {Thunell, Louise and Stadberg, E and Milsom, I and Mattsson, L A},
  issn         = {1600-0412},
  keyword      = {hormone-replacement therapy,attitudes,cross-sectional study,menopause,knowledge},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {395--401},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Changes in attitudes, knowledge and hormone replacement therapy use: a comparative study in two random samples with 6-year interval},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.0001-6349.2005.00725.x},
  volume       = {84},
  year         = {2005},
}