Advanced

Inadvertent arterial catheterization complicating femoral venous access for haemodialysis

Pikwer, Andreas LU ; Sterner, Gunnar LU and Acosta, Stefan LU (2012) In Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology1967-01-01+01:002013-01-01+01:00 46(2). p.156-160
Abstract
Objective. Large-bore catheters for temporary haemodialysis are often placed via the internal jugular or femoral vein, guided by external landmarks or ultrasound techniques. Inadvertent femoral artery catheterization may occur during attempted placement of the dialysis catheter in the femoral vein. Material and methods. This investigation was carried out in Skane University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden. Between 2008 and 2011, patients referred for consultation by a vascular specialist owing to inadvertent arterial catheterization after attempted placement of a dialysis catheter in the femoral vein were noted in a logbook and patients with iatrogenic arterial injuries undergoing vascular repair at Malmo-Lund Hospitals were identified through the... (More)
Objective. Large-bore catheters for temporary haemodialysis are often placed via the internal jugular or femoral vein, guided by external landmarks or ultrasound techniques. Inadvertent femoral artery catheterization may occur during attempted placement of the dialysis catheter in the femoral vein. Material and methods. This investigation was carried out in Skane University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden. Between 2008 and 2011, patients referred for consultation by a vascular specialist owing to inadvertent arterial catheterization after attempted placement of a dialysis catheter in the femoral vein were noted in a logbook and patients with iatrogenic arterial injuries undergoing vascular repair at Malmo-Lund Hospitals were identified through the Swedish vascular registry (Swedvasc). Results. The five included patients had a dialysis catheter (11-13.5 Fr) inserted, without ultrasound guidance, into the femoral artery. One patient suffered from circulatory shock. Two cases were managed with external compression, while three cases required surgical repair. Two patients had postoperative wound infection in the groin. Conclusions. Femoral dialysis catheters should be inserted using ultrasound guidance. Large-bore catheters suspected of being in an inadvertent arterial position should be fixed securely before further diagnostic or interventional considerations. A management algorithm for inadvertently placed catheters in the femoral artery is proposed. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
vascular system injuries, femoral vein, renal dialysis, catheterization, central venous catheter, femoral artery
in
Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology1967-01-01+01:002013-01-01+01:00
volume
46
issue
2
pages
156 - 160
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000301539200013
  • scopus:84858407506
ISSN
0036-5599
DOI
10.3109/00365599.2011.633226
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
c9a45338-21ef-439e-8ed7-65474404cd20 (old id 2515407)
date added to LUP
2012-05-07 09:20:05
date last changed
2017-01-01 05:44:20
@article{c9a45338-21ef-439e-8ed7-65474404cd20,
  abstract     = {Objective. Large-bore catheters for temporary haemodialysis are often placed via the internal jugular or femoral vein, guided by external landmarks or ultrasound techniques. Inadvertent femoral artery catheterization may occur during attempted placement of the dialysis catheter in the femoral vein. Material and methods. This investigation was carried out in Skane University Hospital, Malmo, Sweden. Between 2008 and 2011, patients referred for consultation by a vascular specialist owing to inadvertent arterial catheterization after attempted placement of a dialysis catheter in the femoral vein were noted in a logbook and patients with iatrogenic arterial injuries undergoing vascular repair at Malmo-Lund Hospitals were identified through the Swedish vascular registry (Swedvasc). Results. The five included patients had a dialysis catheter (11-13.5 Fr) inserted, without ultrasound guidance, into the femoral artery. One patient suffered from circulatory shock. Two cases were managed with external compression, while three cases required surgical repair. Two patients had postoperative wound infection in the groin. Conclusions. Femoral dialysis catheters should be inserted using ultrasound guidance. Large-bore catheters suspected of being in an inadvertent arterial position should be fixed securely before further diagnostic or interventional considerations. A management algorithm for inadvertently placed catheters in the femoral artery is proposed.},
  author       = {Pikwer, Andreas and Sterner, Gunnar and Acosta, Stefan},
  issn         = {0036-5599},
  keyword      = {vascular system injuries,femoral vein,renal dialysis,catheterization,central venous catheter,femoral artery},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {156--160},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Scandinavian Journal of Urology and Nephrology1967-01-01+01:002013-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Inadvertent arterial catheterization complicating femoral venous access for haemodialysis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/00365599.2011.633226},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2012},
}