Advanced

Recovery after lung transplantation from a patient perspective - proposing a new framework

Lundmark, Martina LU ; Lennerling, Annette; Almgren, Matilda LU and Forsberg, Anna LU (2016) In Journal of Advanced Nursing 72(12). p.3113-3124
Abstract

AIMS: The aims of this study were two-fold: to develop the concept analysis by Allvin et al. from lung recipients' perspective of their post-transplant recovery process and to identify the recovery trajectories including critical junctions in the post-transplant recovery process after lung transplantation.

BACKGROUND: Lung transplantation is an established treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease. The recovery process after lung transplantation is very demanding. Today, patients are expected to play an active role in their own recovery but require ongoing support during the process.

DESIGN: A deductive, retrospective interview study using directed content analysis and Allvin's recovery concept... (More)

AIMS: The aims of this study were two-fold: to develop the concept analysis by Allvin et al. from lung recipients' perspective of their post-transplant recovery process and to identify the recovery trajectories including critical junctions in the post-transplant recovery process after lung transplantation.

BACKGROUND: Lung transplantation is an established treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease. The recovery process after lung transplantation is very demanding. Today, patients are expected to play an active role in their own recovery but require ongoing support during the process.

DESIGN: A deductive, retrospective interview study using directed content analysis and Allvin's recovery concept analysis.

METHOD: Fifteen adult lung transplant recipients who were due their 12-month follow-up were consecutively included and interviewed during 2015. Patients who were medically unstable or had difficulties speaking Swedish were excluded from this multi-centre study.

FINDINGS: Allvin's concept analysis is partly applicable to the context of lung transplantation. The recipients' experience of the post-transplant recovery process could be confirmed in the main dimensions of the concept analysis, while several sub-dimensions were contradictory and were excluded. Six new sub-dimensions emerged; symptom management, adjusting to physical restraints, achieving an optimum level of psychological well-being, emotional transition, social adaptation and reconstructing daily occupation.

CONCLUSION: The concept analysis by Allvin et al. was possible to expand to fit the lung transplantation context and a new contextual definition of post-transplant recovery after solid organ transplantation was developed. Recovery and health were viewed as two different things.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Advanced Nursing
volume
72
issue
12
pages
12 pages
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000387752000015
  • scopus:84994155138
ISSN
0309-2402
DOI
10.1111/jan.13058
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
25205500-431b-46ab-9210-2bfbb4cda0fd
date added to LUP
2016-09-22 13:39:35
date last changed
2017-03-19 04:35:46
@article{25205500-431b-46ab-9210-2bfbb4cda0fd,
  abstract     = {<p>AIMS: The aims of this study were two-fold: to develop the concept analysis by Allvin et al. from lung recipients' perspective of their post-transplant recovery process and to identify the recovery trajectories including critical junctions in the post-transplant recovery process after lung transplantation.</p><p>BACKGROUND: Lung transplantation is an established treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease. The recovery process after lung transplantation is very demanding. Today, patients are expected to play an active role in their own recovery but require ongoing support during the process.</p><p>DESIGN: A deductive, retrospective interview study using directed content analysis and Allvin's recovery concept analysis.</p><p>METHOD: Fifteen adult lung transplant recipients who were due their 12-month follow-up were consecutively included and interviewed during 2015. Patients who were medically unstable or had difficulties speaking Swedish were excluded from this multi-centre study.</p><p>FINDINGS: Allvin's concept analysis is partly applicable to the context of lung transplantation. The recipients' experience of the post-transplant recovery process could be confirmed in the main dimensions of the concept analysis, while several sub-dimensions were contradictory and were excluded. Six new sub-dimensions emerged; symptom management, adjusting to physical restraints, achieving an optimum level of psychological well-being, emotional transition, social adaptation and reconstructing daily occupation.</p><p>CONCLUSION: The concept analysis by Allvin et al. was possible to expand to fit the lung transplantation context and a new contextual definition of post-transplant recovery after solid organ transplantation was developed. Recovery and health were viewed as two different things.</p>},
  author       = {Lundmark, Martina and Lennerling, Annette and Almgren, Matilda and Forsberg, Anna},
  issn         = {0309-2402},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {06},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {3113--3124},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Advanced Nursing},
  title        = {Recovery after lung transplantation from a patient perspective - proposing a new framework},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jan.13058},
  volume       = {72},
  year         = {2016},
}