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Body mass index and risk of malignant lymphoma in Scandinavian men and women

Chang, E T; Hjalgrim, H; Smedby, K E; Åkerman, Måns LU ; Tani, E; Johnsen, H E; Glimelius, B; Adami, H O and Melbye, M (2005) In Journal of the National Cancer Institute 97(3). p.210-218
Abstract
Background. The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and prevalence of obesity are increasing globally. A suggested positive association between obesity and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma has prompted us to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of malignant lymphoma subtypes in a population-based case-control study. Methods: Telephone interviews were conducted with 3055 case patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 618 case patients with Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed between October 1, 1999, and August 30, 2002, and 3187 population-based control subjects. The interviews assessed current height, normal adult weight, and other possible risk factors. Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence... (More)
Background. The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and prevalence of obesity are increasing globally. A suggested positive association between obesity and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma has prompted us to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of malignant lymphoma subtypes in a population-based case-control study. Methods: Telephone interviews were conducted with 3055 case patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 618 case patients with Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed between October 1, 1999, and August 30, 2002, and 3187 population-based control subjects. The interviews assessed current height, normal adult weight, and other possible risk factors. Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of lymphoma were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: BMI was not associated with risk of overall non-Hodgkin lymphoma or of Hodgkin lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group [BMI greater than or equal to35.0 kg/m(2)] with the normal-weight group [BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)], OR for risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6 to 1.3; P-trend across all categories of BMI = .27). BMI was also not associated with risk of any non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype evaluated, although there was some evidence of a positive association with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group with the normal-weight group, OR for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.9 to 2.4; P-trend = .05). Conclusions: Excess weight does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphoma in general, or with a risk of most major lymphoma subtypes. Hence, the growing incidence of obesity is unlikely to be an important contributor to the increasing incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of the National Cancer Institute
volume
97
issue
3
pages
210 - 218
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000226748200012
  • pmid:15687364
  • scopus:13744263345
ISSN
1460-2105
DOI
10.1093/jnci/dji012
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
10c51c9c-14c1-4781-8fee-6602f2a7e1d7 (old id 254272)
date added to LUP
2007-08-06 14:02:11
date last changed
2017-08-27 05:36:34
@article{10c51c9c-14c1-4781-8fee-6602f2a7e1d7,
  abstract     = {Background. The incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and prevalence of obesity are increasing globally. A suggested positive association between obesity and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma has prompted us to investigate the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of malignant lymphoma subtypes in a population-based case-control study. Methods: Telephone interviews were conducted with 3055 case patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 618 case patients with Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosed between October 1, 1999, and August 30, 2002, and 3187 population-based control subjects. The interviews assessed current height, normal adult weight, and other possible risk factors. Multivariable odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for risk of lymphoma were estimated by unconditional logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: BMI was not associated with risk of overall non-Hodgkin lymphoma or of Hodgkin lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group [BMI greater than or equal to35.0 kg/m(2)] with the normal-weight group [BMI = 18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)], OR for risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma = 0.9, 95% CI = 0.6 to 1.3; P-trend across all categories of BMI = .27). BMI was also not associated with risk of any non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype evaluated, although there was some evidence of a positive association with risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (for example, comparing the highly obese group with the normal-weight group, OR for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma = 1.5, 95% CI = 0.9 to 2.4; P-trend = .05). Conclusions: Excess weight does not appear to be associated with an increased risk of malignant lymphoma in general, or with a risk of most major lymphoma subtypes. Hence, the growing incidence of obesity is unlikely to be an important contributor to the increasing incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma worldwide.},
  author       = {Chang, E T and Hjalgrim, H and Smedby, K E and Åkerman, Måns and Tani, E and Johnsen, H E and Glimelius, B and Adami, H O and Melbye, M},
  issn         = {1460-2105},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {210--218},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {Journal of the National Cancer Institute},
  title        = {Body mass index and risk of malignant lymphoma in Scandinavian men and women},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jnci/dji012},
  volume       = {97},
  year         = {2005},
}