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Herbal medicine, Chaplin, and "The Kid"

Pandolfi, Maurizio LU and Zilletti, Lucilla (2012) In European Journal of Internal Medicine 23(4). p.330-332
Abstract
At variance with other largely safe complementary alternative medicines like homeopathy and acupuncture, which only carry the risk of inducing patients to shun effective treatment, herbal remedies are real, albeit impure, drugs and therefore fully capable of producing undesirable consequences if misused. The advantages they offer are uncertain since genuine evidence of efficacy and effectiveness is present in only a few cases. A result of this imbalance is that studies in this field are considerably more meaningful when they deal with untoward effects than with therapeutic uses. This disproportion has suggested to us the curious similarity with the situation portrayed in the film "The Kid" where the essential task of the protagonist... (More)
At variance with other largely safe complementary alternative medicines like homeopathy and acupuncture, which only carry the risk of inducing patients to shun effective treatment, herbal remedies are real, albeit impure, drugs and therefore fully capable of producing undesirable consequences if misused. The advantages they offer are uncertain since genuine evidence of efficacy and effectiveness is present in only a few cases. A result of this imbalance is that studies in this field are considerably more meaningful when they deal with untoward effects than with therapeutic uses. This disproportion has suggested to us the curious similarity with the situation portrayed in the film "The Kid" where the essential task of the protagonist (Chaplin) is to repair the windows his stone-throwing child has just broken. (C) 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
European Journal of Internal Medicine
volume
23
issue
4
pages
330 - 332
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000303663400017
  • scopus:84860512851
ISSN
1879-0828
DOI
10.1016/j.ejim.2012.01.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
5a26bab4-8fbf-4832-b886-27a5f9f129b9 (old id 2545405)
date added to LUP
2012-06-01 09:36:58
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:10:42
@article{5a26bab4-8fbf-4832-b886-27a5f9f129b9,
  abstract     = {At variance with other largely safe complementary alternative medicines like homeopathy and acupuncture, which only carry the risk of inducing patients to shun effective treatment, herbal remedies are real, albeit impure, drugs and therefore fully capable of producing undesirable consequences if misused. The advantages they offer are uncertain since genuine evidence of efficacy and effectiveness is present in only a few cases. A result of this imbalance is that studies in this field are considerably more meaningful when they deal with untoward effects than with therapeutic uses. This disproportion has suggested to us the curious similarity with the situation portrayed in the film "The Kid" where the essential task of the protagonist (Chaplin) is to repair the windows his stone-throwing child has just broken. (C) 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Pandolfi, Maurizio and Zilletti, Lucilla},
  issn         = {1879-0828},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {330--332},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {European Journal of Internal Medicine},
  title        = {Herbal medicine, Chaplin, and "The Kid"},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejim.2012.01.010},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2012},
}