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Does regular exercise during pregnancy influence lumbopelvic pain? A randomized controlled trial

Stafne, Signe N.; Salvesen, Kjell A.; Romundstad, Pal R.; Stuge, Britt LU and Morkved, Siv (2012) In Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica 91(5). p.552-559
Abstract
Objective. To study lumbopelvic pain in women randomized to a regular exercise program during pregnancy in comparison to women receiving standard antenatal care. Design. A two-armed, two-center, randomized controlled trial. Setting. St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital and Stavanger University Hospital. Population. A total of 855 pregnant women were randomized to intervention or control groups. Methods. The intervention was a 12 week exercise program, including aerobic and strengthening exercises, conducted between 20 and 36 weeks of pregnancy. One weekly group session was led by physiotherapists, and home exercises were encouraged twice a week. The control group received standard antenatal care. Main outcome measures.... (More)
Objective. To study lumbopelvic pain in women randomized to a regular exercise program during pregnancy in comparison to women receiving standard antenatal care. Design. A two-armed, two-center, randomized controlled trial. Setting. St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital and Stavanger University Hospital. Population. A total of 855 pregnant women were randomized to intervention or control groups. Methods. The intervention was a 12 week exercise program, including aerobic and strengthening exercises, conducted between 20 and 36 weeks of pregnancy. One weekly group session was led by physiotherapists, and home exercises were encouraged twice a week. The control group received standard antenatal care. Main outcome measures. Self-reports of lumbopelvic pain and sick leave due to lumbopelvic pain. The data were analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Results. There were no significant differences between groups of women reporting lumbopelvic pain at 36 weeks (74 vs. 75%, p=0.76). The proportion of women on sick leave due to lumbopelvic pain was lower in the intervention group (22% vs 31%, p=0.01). Conclusions. Exercise during pregnancy does not influence the prevalence of lumbopelvic pain, but women offered a regular exercise course seem to handle the disorder better. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Exercise, pregnancy, lumbopelvic pain, prevention, sick leave
in
Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
volume
91
issue
5
pages
552 - 559
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000303001500006
  • scopus:84860237716
ISSN
1600-0412
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0412.2012.01382.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a055a1a6-6748-472c-adc0-507a173d3620 (old id 2570861)
date added to LUP
2012-06-01 08:52:43
date last changed
2017-11-19 03:57:44
@article{a055a1a6-6748-472c-adc0-507a173d3620,
  abstract     = {Objective. To study lumbopelvic pain in women randomized to a regular exercise program during pregnancy in comparison to women receiving standard antenatal care. Design. A two-armed, two-center, randomized controlled trial. Setting. St Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital and Stavanger University Hospital. Population. A total of 855 pregnant women were randomized to intervention or control groups. Methods. The intervention was a 12 week exercise program, including aerobic and strengthening exercises, conducted between 20 and 36 weeks of pregnancy. One weekly group session was led by physiotherapists, and home exercises were encouraged twice a week. The control group received standard antenatal care. Main outcome measures. Self-reports of lumbopelvic pain and sick leave due to lumbopelvic pain. The data were analysed according to the intention-to-treat principle. Results. There were no significant differences between groups of women reporting lumbopelvic pain at 36 weeks (74 vs. 75%, p=0.76). The proportion of women on sick leave due to lumbopelvic pain was lower in the intervention group (22% vs 31%, p=0.01). Conclusions. Exercise during pregnancy does not influence the prevalence of lumbopelvic pain, but women offered a regular exercise course seem to handle the disorder better.},
  author       = {Stafne, Signe N. and Salvesen, Kjell A. and Romundstad, Pal R. and Stuge, Britt and Morkved, Siv},
  issn         = {1600-0412},
  keyword      = {Exercise,pregnancy,lumbopelvic pain,prevention,sick leave},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {552--559},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica},
  title        = {Does regular exercise during pregnancy influence lumbopelvic pain? A randomized controlled trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0412.2012.01382.x},
  volume       = {91},
  year         = {2012},
}