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Results from a nationwide postmarketing cohort study of patients in Sweden treated with etanercept

Feltelius, N; Fored, CM; Blomqvist, P; Bertilsson, L; Geborek, Pierre LU ; Jacobsson, Lennart LU ; Lindblad, S; Lysholm, J; Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, S and Saxne, Tore LU , et al. (2005) In Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases 64(2). p.246-252
Abstract
Objectives: To describe a nationwide system for postmarketing follow up of new antirheumatic drugs in Sweden, and to analyse safety and effectiveness in an etanercept treated patient cohort. Methods: Etanercept became available in Sweden for prescribing on a named patient basis in 1999. All patients treated were included in a follow up of intensified adverse event reporting and recording of clinical outcome during 24 months, according to the EULAR core set. Results: The mean (SD) disease activity score (DAS 28) value at inclusion among 820 patients recruited on a named patient basis during year 1 was 5.99 (1.19). After two years, 21% (n = 172) of these patients had discontinued the treatment. Of the remaining 648 patients, 68% ( n = 442)... (More)
Objectives: To describe a nationwide system for postmarketing follow up of new antirheumatic drugs in Sweden, and to analyse safety and effectiveness in an etanercept treated patient cohort. Methods: Etanercept became available in Sweden for prescribing on a named patient basis in 1999. All patients treated were included in a follow up of intensified adverse event reporting and recording of clinical outcome during 24 months, according to the EULAR core set. Results: The mean (SD) disease activity score (DAS 28) value at inclusion among 820 patients recruited on a named patient basis during year 1 was 5.99 (1.19). After two years, 21% (n = 172) of these patients had discontinued the treatment. Of the remaining 648 patients, 68% ( n = 442) responded to the treatment. However, in 55% of the responders, the disease activity was intermediate or high ( mean DAS 28, 3.37 (1.20)). In all, 540 adverse events were reported in 421 adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports, in 294 patients. The events in 80 reports (19%) were serious. Twenty two per cent of the events were infections, of which 24% ( n = 29) were serious. The incidence of serious adverse events remained constant over time. Conclusions: At start of etanercept treatment, patients had high disease activity. Activity remained high in a large proportion of the responding patients. Although serious ADRs occurred during late phases of treatment, no unexpected safety problems arose. No specific indicators of ADR risk were found. The monitoring system that was established may be useful in future postmarketing surveillance. (Less)
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Contribution to journal
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published
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Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases
volume
64
issue
2
pages
246 - 252
publisher
British Medical Association
external identifiers
  • wos:000226279200017
  • pmid:15208177
  • scopus:19944433874
ISSN
1468-2060
DOI
10.1136/ard.2004.023473
language
English
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yes
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889b45b3-c6a7-4152-9a6f-6eb084d73281 (old id 257706)
alternative location
http://ard.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/64/2/246
date added to LUP
2007-08-23 13:53:27
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2017-02-12 04:02:08
@article{889b45b3-c6a7-4152-9a6f-6eb084d73281,
  abstract     = {Objectives: To describe a nationwide system for postmarketing follow up of new antirheumatic drugs in Sweden, and to analyse safety and effectiveness in an etanercept treated patient cohort. Methods: Etanercept became available in Sweden for prescribing on a named patient basis in 1999. All patients treated were included in a follow up of intensified adverse event reporting and recording of clinical outcome during 24 months, according to the EULAR core set. Results: The mean (SD) disease activity score (DAS 28) value at inclusion among 820 patients recruited on a named patient basis during year 1 was 5.99 (1.19). After two years, 21% (n = 172) of these patients had discontinued the treatment. Of the remaining 648 patients, 68% ( n = 442) responded to the treatment. However, in 55% of the responders, the disease activity was intermediate or high ( mean DAS 28, 3.37 (1.20)). In all, 540 adverse events were reported in 421 adverse drug reaction (ADR) reports, in 294 patients. The events in 80 reports (19%) were serious. Twenty two per cent of the events were infections, of which 24% ( n = 29) were serious. The incidence of serious adverse events remained constant over time. Conclusions: At start of etanercept treatment, patients had high disease activity. Activity remained high in a large proportion of the responding patients. Although serious ADRs occurred during late phases of treatment, no unexpected safety problems arose. No specific indicators of ADR risk were found. The monitoring system that was established may be useful in future postmarketing surveillance.},
  author       = {Feltelius, N and Fored, CM and Blomqvist, P and Bertilsson, L and Geborek, Pierre and Jacobsson, Lennart and Lindblad, S and Lysholm, J and Rantapaa-Dahlqvist, S and Saxne, Tore and Klareskog, L},
  issn         = {1468-2060},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {246--252},
  publisher    = {British Medical Association},
  series       = {Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases},
  title        = {Results from a nationwide postmarketing cohort study of patients in Sweden treated with etanercept},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/ard.2004.023473},
  volume       = {64},
  year         = {2005},
}