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Trauma management: Chernobyl in Belarus and Ukraine

Zhukova, Ekatherina LU (2016) In British Journal of Sociology 67(2). p.195-215
Abstract
Although the Chernobyl nuclear disaster happened in the Soviet Union in 1986, we still do not know how the most affected states – Ukraine and Belarus – have managed this tragedy since independence. Drawing on the concept of cultural trauma, this article compares Chernobyl narratives in Belarus and Ukraine over the past 28 years. It shows that national narratives of Chernobyl differ, representing the varying ways in which the state overcomes trauma. Our understanding of post‐communist transformations can be improved by analysing trauma management narratives and their importance for new national identity construction. These narratives also bring new insights to our vision of cultural trauma by linking it to ontological insecurity. The... (More)
Although the Chernobyl nuclear disaster happened in the Soviet Union in 1986, we still do not know how the most affected states – Ukraine and Belarus – have managed this tragedy since independence. Drawing on the concept of cultural trauma, this article compares Chernobyl narratives in Belarus and Ukraine over the past 28 years. It shows that national narratives of Chernobyl differ, representing the varying ways in which the state overcomes trauma. Our understanding of post‐communist transformations can be improved by analysing trauma management narratives and their importance for new national identity construction. These narratives also bring new insights to our vision of cultural trauma by linking it to ontological insecurity. The article demonstrates how the state can become an arena of trauma process as it commands material and symbolic resources to deal with trauma. In general, it contributes to a better understanding of how the same traumatic event can become a source of solidarity in one community, but a source of hostility in another. (Less)
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author
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
British Journal of Sociology
volume
67
issue
2
pages
195 - 215
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:84973878958
ISSN
0007-1315
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
25ad3388-3361-4786-824e-ecded3b0ce8f
date added to LUP
2020-02-06 18:47:28
date last changed
2020-05-26 05:39:13
@article{25ad3388-3361-4786-824e-ecded3b0ce8f,
  abstract     = {Although the Chernobyl nuclear disaster happened in the Soviet Union in 1986, we still do not know how the most affected states – Ukraine and Belarus – have managed this tragedy since independence. Drawing on the concept of cultural trauma, this article compares Chernobyl narratives in Belarus and Ukraine over the past 28 years. It shows that national narratives of Chernobyl differ, representing the varying ways in which the state overcomes trauma. Our understanding of post‐communist transformations can be improved by analysing trauma management narratives and their importance for new national identity construction. These narratives also bring new insights to our vision of cultural trauma by linking it to ontological insecurity. The article demonstrates how the state can become an arena of trauma process as it commands material and symbolic resources to deal with trauma. In general, it contributes to a better understanding of how the same traumatic event can become a source of solidarity in one community, but a source of hostility in another.},
  author       = {Zhukova, Ekatherina},
  issn         = {0007-1315},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {195--215},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {British Journal of Sociology},
  title        = {Trauma management: Chernobyl in Belarus and Ukraine},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2016},
}