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Impulse oscillometry may be of value in detecting early manifestations of COPD.

Frantz, Sophia LU ; Nihlén, Ulf LU ; Dencker, Magnus LU ; Engström, Gunnar LU ; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran LU and Wollmer, Per LU (2012) In Respiratory Medicine 106(8). p.1116-1123
Abstract
BACKGROUND:

Spirometry is used to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Impulse oscillometry system (IOS) allows determination of respiratory impedance indices, which might be of potential value in early COPD, although previous experience is limited. We examined pulmonary resistance and reactance measured by IOS in subjects with or without self-reported chronic bronchitis or emphysema or COPD (Q+ or Q-) and subjects with or without COPD diagnosed according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria (G+ or G-).



METHODS:

From a previous population-based study 450 subjects were examined with spirometry and IOS and answered a questionnaire on... (More)
BACKGROUND:

Spirometry is used to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Impulse oscillometry system (IOS) allows determination of respiratory impedance indices, which might be of potential value in early COPD, although previous experience is limited. We examined pulmonary resistance and reactance measured by IOS in subjects with or without self-reported chronic bronchitis or emphysema or COPD (Q+ or Q-) and subjects with or without COPD diagnosed according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria (G+ or G-).



METHODS:

From a previous population-based study 450 subjects were examined with spirometry and IOS and answered a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and diseases.



RESULTS:

Seventy-seven subjects were Q+, of whom 34 also were G+. Q+/G- subjects (n = 43) reported respiratory symptoms more frequently (35-40% vs 8-14%) but had higher FEV(1) (100% vs 87%) than Q-/G+ subjects (n = 90), p < 0.05 for both comparisons. Q+ subjects had higher pulmonary resistance and lower pulmonary reactance than Q- subjects (p < 0.01 for all comparisons). The same pattern was seen both in G+ subjects ((Q+/Q-) R5 0.39/0.32, R5-R20 0.10/0.07, X5 0.13/0.09, AX 0.55/0.27, p < 0.05 for all) and G- subjects ((Q+/Q-) R5 0.35/0.29, R5-R20 0.08/0.06, X5 0.10/0.08, AX 0.31/0.19 p < 0.05 for all) except for R20 (adjusted for gender and age).



CONCLUSIONS:

Self-reported chronic bronchitis or emphysema or COPD was associated with higher pulmonary resistance and lower pulmonary reactance measured by IOS, both among subjects with and without COPD according to GOLD criteria. IOS may have the potential to detect pathology associated with COPD earlier than spirometry. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Respiratory Medicine
volume
106
issue
8
pages
1116 - 1123
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000306381300006
  • pmid:22613172
  • scopus:84862530934
ISSN
1532-3064
DOI
10.1016/j.rmed.2012.04.010
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
eb3e40b1-3d39-4ca1-b4ed-d71ccb9f8309 (old id 2608661)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22613172?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-06-03 20:14:00
date last changed
2017-10-08 03:47:28
@article{eb3e40b1-3d39-4ca1-b4ed-d71ccb9f8309,
  abstract     = {BACKGROUND: <br/><br>
Spirometry is used to diagnose chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The Impulse oscillometry system (IOS) allows determination of respiratory impedance indices, which might be of potential value in early COPD, although previous experience is limited. We examined pulmonary resistance and reactance measured by IOS in subjects with or without self-reported chronic bronchitis or emphysema or COPD (Q+ or Q-) and subjects with or without COPD diagnosed according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) criteria (G+ or G-). <br/><br>
<br/><br>
METHODS: <br/><br>
From a previous population-based study 450 subjects were examined with spirometry and IOS and answered a questionnaire on respiratory symptoms and diseases. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
RESULTS: <br/><br>
Seventy-seven subjects were Q+, of whom 34 also were G+. Q+/G- subjects (n = 43) reported respiratory symptoms more frequently (35-40% vs 8-14%) but had higher FEV(1) (100% vs 87%) than Q-/G+ subjects (n = 90), p &lt; 0.05 for both comparisons. Q+ subjects had higher pulmonary resistance and lower pulmonary reactance than Q- subjects (p &lt; 0.01 for all comparisons). The same pattern was seen both in G+ subjects ((Q+/Q-) R5 0.39/0.32, R5-R20 0.10/0.07, X5 0.13/0.09, AX 0.55/0.27, p &lt; 0.05 for all) and G- subjects ((Q+/Q-) R5 0.35/0.29, R5-R20 0.08/0.06, X5 0.10/0.08, AX 0.31/0.19 p &lt; 0.05 for all) except for R20 (adjusted for gender and age). <br/><br>
<br/><br>
CONCLUSIONS: <br/><br>
Self-reported chronic bronchitis or emphysema or COPD was associated with higher pulmonary resistance and lower pulmonary reactance measured by IOS, both among subjects with and without COPD according to GOLD criteria. IOS may have the potential to detect pathology associated with COPD earlier than spirometry.},
  author       = {Frantz, Sophia and Nihlén, Ulf and Dencker, Magnus and Engström, Gunnar and Löfdahl, Claes-Göran and Wollmer, Per},
  issn         = {1532-3064},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1116--1123},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Respiratory Medicine},
  title        = {Impulse oscillometry may be of value in detecting early manifestations of COPD.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2012.04.010},
  volume       = {106},
  year         = {2012},
}