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Prevalence of current and chronic pain and their influences upon work and healthcare-seeking: A population study

Gerdle, B; Björk, Jonas LU ; Henriksson, C and Bengtsson, A (2004) In Journal of Rheumatology 31(7). p.1399-1406
Abstract
Objective. To investigate the prevalence of current and chronic pain and their relationship to pain intensity, sex, age, income, employment status, citizenship, marital status, urban residence, occupational activity, and healthcare-seeking based on a representative sample from a Swedish county. Methods. A cross-sectional survey using a postal questionnaire was sent to a representative sample (n = 9952) of the target population (284,073 people, age 18-74 yrs) in a county (Ostergotland) in southern Sweden. A questionnaire was mailed and followed by 2 postal reminders if necessary. Results. The participation rate was 76.7% (n = 7637); nonparticipants were on average younger, male, and earned less money. The overall point prevalence of pain... (More)
Objective. To investigate the prevalence of current and chronic pain and their relationship to pain intensity, sex, age, income, employment status, citizenship, marital status, urban residence, occupational activity, and healthcare-seeking based on a representative sample from a Swedish county. Methods. A cross-sectional survey using a postal questionnaire was sent to a representative sample (n = 9952) of the target population (284,073 people, age 18-74 yrs) in a county (Ostergotland) in southern Sweden. A questionnaire was mailed and followed by 2 postal reminders if necessary. Results. The participation rate was 76.7% (n = 7637); nonparticipants were on average younger, male, and earned less money. The overall point prevalence of pain was 48.9%. The corresponding one-month period prevalence was 63.0%, and pain on several occasions during the previous 3 months was reported by 61.3% of participants. The prevalence of chronic pain (pain > 3 months) was 53.7%. Female sex, age, and sick leave/early retirement were generally of significant importance in the regressions of pain. No sex factor was found in the regressions of pain frequency and pain intensity. Chronic pain - especially frequent and intensive pain - showed clear associations with healthcare-seeking and occupational activity. Conclusion. High prevalence of current pain (48.9%) and chronic pain (53.7%) were found in this community-based study. Being female, older, and on sick leave or early retirement were generally of significant importance in the regressions of pain. Chronic pain showed clear associations with healthcare-seeking and occupational activity, indicating considerable socioeconomic costs. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
prevalence, pain, work, epidemiology, healthcare
in
Journal of Rheumatology
volume
31
issue
7
pages
1399 - 1406
publisher
J Rheumatol Publ Co
external identifiers
  • wos:000222481600028
  • pmid:15229963
  • scopus:3042770910
ISSN
0315-162X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b0e8924e-4713-4c48-bd09-3cc00dfe4a96 (old id 264274)
alternative location
http://www.jrheum.com/~temp/subscribers/04/07/1399.html
date added to LUP
2007-10-26 13:36:05
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:47:09
@article{b0e8924e-4713-4c48-bd09-3cc00dfe4a96,
  abstract     = {Objective. To investigate the prevalence of current and chronic pain and their relationship to pain intensity, sex, age, income, employment status, citizenship, marital status, urban residence, occupational activity, and healthcare-seeking based on a representative sample from a Swedish county. Methods. A cross-sectional survey using a postal questionnaire was sent to a representative sample (n = 9952) of the target population (284,073 people, age 18-74 yrs) in a county (Ostergotland) in southern Sweden. A questionnaire was mailed and followed by 2 postal reminders if necessary. Results. The participation rate was 76.7% (n = 7637); nonparticipants were on average younger, male, and earned less money. The overall point prevalence of pain was 48.9%. The corresponding one-month period prevalence was 63.0%, and pain on several occasions during the previous 3 months was reported by 61.3% of participants. The prevalence of chronic pain (pain > 3 months) was 53.7%. Female sex, age, and sick leave/early retirement were generally of significant importance in the regressions of pain. No sex factor was found in the regressions of pain frequency and pain intensity. Chronic pain - especially frequent and intensive pain - showed clear associations with healthcare-seeking and occupational activity. Conclusion. High prevalence of current pain (48.9%) and chronic pain (53.7%) were found in this community-based study. Being female, older, and on sick leave or early retirement were generally of significant importance in the regressions of pain. Chronic pain showed clear associations with healthcare-seeking and occupational activity, indicating considerable socioeconomic costs.},
  author       = {Gerdle, B and Björk, Jonas and Henriksson, C and Bengtsson, A},
  issn         = {0315-162X},
  keyword      = {prevalence,pain,work,epidemiology,healthcare},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1399--1406},
  publisher    = {J Rheumatol Publ Co},
  series       = {Journal of Rheumatology},
  title        = {Prevalence of current and chronic pain and their influences upon work and healthcare-seeking: A population study},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2004},
}