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Comparison of thermal manikins of different body shapes and size

Kuklane, Kalev LU ; Sandsund, Mariann; Reinertsen, Randi Eidsmo; Tochihara, Yutaka; Fukazawa, Takako and Holmér, Ingvar LU (2004) In European Journal of Applied Physiology1999-01-01+01:00 92(6). p.683-688
Abstract
Differences between manikins may be present due to manikin body shapes (male versus female). In order to examine such differences a study was designed. Comparisons were carried out based on: (1) tight versus loose clothing; (2) serial versus parallel calculation models; (3) even versus uneven clothing (insulation) distribution; and (4) the effect of donning clothes. Differences were observed between female and male manikins depending on body shape. However, these differences were within the range that was observed in the Subzero project, and were comparable with differences between manikins of male body shapes. Manikins behaved differently according to clothing adjustments. Tight-fitting clothes resulted in smaller differences. The effects... (More)
Differences between manikins may be present due to manikin body shapes (male versus female). In order to examine such differences a study was designed. Comparisons were carried out based on: (1) tight versus loose clothing; (2) serial versus parallel calculation models; (3) even versus uneven clothing (insulation) distribution; and (4) the effect of donning clothes. Differences were observed between female and male manikins depending on body shape. However, these differences were within the range that was observed in the Subzero project, and were comparable with differences between manikins of male body shapes. Manikins behaved differently according to clothing adjustments. Tight-fitting clothes resulted in smaller differences. The effects of donning clothes were more pronounced with the serial calculation model, while the results generated by the serial and parallel calculation models differed more if the insulation was unevenly distributed (24% and 12% respectively). In order to examine the effect of body size, two baby manikins were compared to an adult manikin. The experimental conditions involved air layer insulation measurements (AL), lying on the back on an insulating surface (OB), and lying on the back on an insulating surface, covered with a sheet (OBS, baby manikins only). The acquired AL insulation for all manikins were very similar. The insulation value of adult manikin tested under condition OB differed from the others. This was related to flexible joints allowing the arms and legs to be in contact with the insulating surface, while baby manikins retained their arms and legs in the air. The baby manikins performed similarly in OBS tests. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
female, male, calculation model, insulation distribution, manikin, thermal insulation
in
European Journal of Applied Physiology1999-01-01+01:00
volume
92
issue
6
pages
683 - 688
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • wos:000224518000017
  • pmid:15127207
  • scopus:6344223441
ISSN
1439-6327
DOI
10.1007/s00421-004-1116-3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
62696cbe-bb58-43b7-b846-7c4eb54d49a3 (old id 264370)
date added to LUP
2007-10-23 19:52:34
date last changed
2017-11-05 03:40:33
@article{62696cbe-bb58-43b7-b846-7c4eb54d49a3,
  abstract     = {Differences between manikins may be present due to manikin body shapes (male versus female). In order to examine such differences a study was designed. Comparisons were carried out based on: (1) tight versus loose clothing; (2) serial versus parallel calculation models; (3) even versus uneven clothing (insulation) distribution; and (4) the effect of donning clothes. Differences were observed between female and male manikins depending on body shape. However, these differences were within the range that was observed in the Subzero project, and were comparable with differences between manikins of male body shapes. Manikins behaved differently according to clothing adjustments. Tight-fitting clothes resulted in smaller differences. The effects of donning clothes were more pronounced with the serial calculation model, while the results generated by the serial and parallel calculation models differed more if the insulation was unevenly distributed (24% and 12% respectively). In order to examine the effect of body size, two baby manikins were compared to an adult manikin. The experimental conditions involved air layer insulation measurements (AL), lying on the back on an insulating surface (OB), and lying on the back on an insulating surface, covered with a sheet (OBS, baby manikins only). The acquired AL insulation for all manikins were very similar. The insulation value of adult manikin tested under condition OB differed from the others. This was related to flexible joints allowing the arms and legs to be in contact with the insulating surface, while baby manikins retained their arms and legs in the air. The baby manikins performed similarly in OBS tests.},
  author       = {Kuklane, Kalev and Sandsund, Mariann and Reinertsen, Randi Eidsmo and Tochihara, Yutaka and Fukazawa, Takako and Holmér, Ingvar},
  issn         = {1439-6327},
  keyword      = {female,male,calculation model,insulation distribution,manikin,thermal insulation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {683--688},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Journal of Applied Physiology1999-01-01+01:00},
  title        = {Comparison of thermal manikins of different body shapes and size},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00421-004-1116-3},
  volume       = {92},
  year         = {2004},
}