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Care and consequences of traumatic brain injury in Neolithic Sweden : A case study of ante mortem skull trauma and brain injury addressed through the bioarchaeology of care

Tornberg, Anna LU and Jacobsson, Lars LU (2018) In International Journal of Osteoarchaeology 28(2). p.188-198
Abstract

A number of papers have provided insight into frequencies of violence-related trauma, especially skull trauma, in Northern European skeletal assemblages dating to the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Although the cases are often well described, they lack further discussion about the consequences of skull trauma for the injured individual and the implications for the surrounding society, especially considering severe skull trauma leading to traumatic brain injuries. In this paper, we address questions of trauma and care for one individual associated with the Swedish-Norwegian Battle Axe Culture who suffered from 2 severe ante mortem skull traumas probably leading to brain injuries. These questions are addressed using the Web-based application... (More)

A number of papers have provided insight into frequencies of violence-related trauma, especially skull trauma, in Northern European skeletal assemblages dating to the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Although the cases are often well described, they lack further discussion about the consequences of skull trauma for the injured individual and the implications for the surrounding society, especially considering severe skull trauma leading to traumatic brain injuries. In this paper, we address questions of trauma and care for one individual associated with the Swedish-Norwegian Battle Axe Culture who suffered from 2 severe ante mortem skull traumas probably leading to brain injuries. These questions are addressed using the Web-based application and analytic tool Index of Care. We found that daily care, both short term with basic needs such as nutrition and grooming and long term with cognitive impairments, was available in the Neolithic society. Considering the frequent number of ante mortem skull trauma in the Neolithic and Bronze Age skeletal assemblages, traumatic brain injury was probably a common phenomenon. We argue that the care provided was a necessity for survival and maintenance of a socially sustainable society.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Battle Axe Culture, Bioarchaeology of care, Interpersonal violence, Neolithic, Skull trauma, Transition analysis, Traumatic brain injury
in
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology
volume
28
issue
2
pages
188 - 198
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • scopus:85043452069
ISSN
1047-482X
DOI
10.1002/oa.2646
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
26541fd0-f58b-4bd6-a700-11a57e0a3580
date added to LUP
2018-03-22 14:30:13
date last changed
2020-02-19 04:53:29
@article{26541fd0-f58b-4bd6-a700-11a57e0a3580,
  abstract     = {<p>A number of papers have provided insight into frequencies of violence-related trauma, especially skull trauma, in Northern European skeletal assemblages dating to the Neolithic and Bronze Age. Although the cases are often well described, they lack further discussion about the consequences of skull trauma for the injured individual and the implications for the surrounding society, especially considering severe skull trauma leading to traumatic brain injuries. In this paper, we address questions of trauma and care for one individual associated with the Swedish-Norwegian Battle Axe Culture who suffered from 2 severe ante mortem skull traumas probably leading to brain injuries. These questions are addressed using the Web-based application and analytic tool Index of Care. We found that daily care, both short term with basic needs such as nutrition and grooming and long term with cognitive impairments, was available in the Neolithic society. Considering the frequent number of ante mortem skull trauma in the Neolithic and Bronze Age skeletal assemblages, traumatic brain injury was probably a common phenomenon. We argue that the care provided was a necessity for survival and maintenance of a socially sustainable society.</p>},
  author       = {Tornberg, Anna and Jacobsson, Lars},
  issn         = {1047-482X},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {188--198},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {International Journal of Osteoarchaeology},
  title        = {Care and consequences of traumatic brain injury in Neolithic Sweden : A case study of ante mortem skull trauma and brain injury addressed through the bioarchaeology of care},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/oa.2646},
  doi          = {10.1002/oa.2646},
  volume       = {28},
  year         = {2018},
}