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Cold but comfortable? Application of comfort criteria to cold environments

Holmér, Ingvar LU (2004) In Indoor Air 14(s7). p.27-31
Abstract
Fanger defined two physiological criteria that are basic requirements for people's perception of thermal neutrality and, eventually, thermal comfort. Mean skin temperature and evaporative heat loss are defined as functions of metabolic rate. The equations are derived from experiments in light clothing at or close to normal indoor climate. Relations between skin temperature and sweating on the one hand and thermal sensation and comfort on the other are well recognized; the precise description of the relationships vary and may differ from normal indoor environments to more extreme thermal stress. In moderately cold environments (around +10degreesC) ISO/DIS 7730 and ISO/DIS 11079 prescribe significantly different responses. Evaluation of the... (More)
Fanger defined two physiological criteria that are basic requirements for people's perception of thermal neutrality and, eventually, thermal comfort. Mean skin temperature and evaporative heat loss are defined as functions of metabolic rate. The equations are derived from experiments in light clothing at or close to normal indoor climate. Relations between skin temperature and sweating on the one hand and thermal sensation and comfort on the other are well recognized; the precise description of the relationships vary and may differ from normal indoor environments to more extreme thermal stress. In moderately cold environments (around +10degreesC) ISO/DIS 7730 and ISO/DIS 11079 prescribe significantly different responses. Evaluation of the rationale behind the comfort criteria and the basic heat transfer equations in the two models reveals some clear differences. By modification of the sweating criteria and some of the heat transfer equations, predictions become much more similar. It is concluded that the basic comfort criteria may apply also to moderately cold and cold environments, but must consider the complex heat transfer through multilayer clothing in a more adequate way. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
model, prediction, perception, method, evaporation, clothing, cold stress, skin temperature
in
Indoor Air
volume
14
issue
s7
pages
27 - 31
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000223590700003
  • scopus:20844442292
ISSN
0905-6947
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0668.2004.00269.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
36510440-09f1-41b2-a012-77ebcfcebee2 (old id 269286)
date added to LUP
2007-10-30 16:03:29
date last changed
2017-09-03 04:39:41
@article{36510440-09f1-41b2-a012-77ebcfcebee2,
  abstract     = {Fanger defined two physiological criteria that are basic requirements for people's perception of thermal neutrality and, eventually, thermal comfort. Mean skin temperature and evaporative heat loss are defined as functions of metabolic rate. The equations are derived from experiments in light clothing at or close to normal indoor climate. Relations between skin temperature and sweating on the one hand and thermal sensation and comfort on the other are well recognized; the precise description of the relationships vary and may differ from normal indoor environments to more extreme thermal stress. In moderately cold environments (around +10degreesC) ISO/DIS 7730 and ISO/DIS 11079 prescribe significantly different responses. Evaluation of the rationale behind the comfort criteria and the basic heat transfer equations in the two models reveals some clear differences. By modification of the sweating criteria and some of the heat transfer equations, predictions become much more similar. It is concluded that the basic comfort criteria may apply also to moderately cold and cold environments, but must consider the complex heat transfer through multilayer clothing in a more adequate way.},
  author       = {Holmér, Ingvar},
  issn         = {0905-6947},
  keyword      = {model,prediction,perception,method,evaporation,clothing,cold stress,skin temperature},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {s7},
  pages        = {27--31},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Indoor Air},
  title        = {Cold but comfortable? Application of comfort criteria to cold environments},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0668.2004.00269.x},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2004},
}