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Generation of renal tubules at the interface of an artificial interstitium

Minuth, W; Sorokin, Lydia LU and Schumacher, K (2004) In Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry 14(4-6). p.387-394
Abstract
During kidney development a multitude of tubular portions is formed. Little knowledge is available by which cellbiological mechanism a cluster of embryonic cells is able to generate the threedimensional structure of a tubule. However, this know-how is most important in tissue engineering approaches such as the generation of an artificial kidney module or for the therapy of renal diseases using stem cells. To obtain cellbiological insights in parenchyme development we elaborate a new technique to generate under in vitro conditions renal tubules derived from the embryonic cortex of neonatal rabbits. The aim of the experiments is to establish a specific extracellular environment allowing optimal threedimensional development of renal tubules... (More)
During kidney development a multitude of tubular portions is formed. Little knowledge is available by which cellbiological mechanism a cluster of embryonic cells is able to generate the threedimensional structure of a tubule. However, this know-how is most important in tissue engineering approaches such as the generation of an artificial kidney module or for the therapy of renal diseases using stem cells. To obtain cellbiological insights in parenchyme development we elaborate a new technique to generate under in vitro conditions renal tubules derived from the embryonic cortex of neonatal rabbits. The aim of the experiments is to establish a specific extracellular environment allowing optimal threedimensional development of renal tubules under serum-free culture conditions. In the present paper we demonstrate features of the renal stem cell niche and show their isolation as intact microcompartiments for advanced tissue culture. Perfusion culture in containers exhibiting a big dead fluid volume results in the development of a flat collecting duct (CD) epithelium at the surface of the tissue explant. In contrast, by fine-tuning the dead fluid volume within a perfusion culture container by an artificial interstitium made of a polyester fleece shows the generation of tubules. It is an up to date unknown morphogenetic information which tells the cells to form tubular structures. Copyright (C) 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
perfusion culture, polyester fleece, artificial interstitium, tubules, renal stem cells, epithelium, tissue engineering
in
Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry
volume
14
issue
4-6
pages
387 - 394
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000223489700022
  • pmid:15319542
  • scopus:4444256192
ISSN
1015-8987
DOI
10.1159/000080348
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
437a907c-3414-482f-8858-a7c89e52cacb (old id 269320)
date added to LUP
2007-10-28 15:10:01
date last changed
2017-09-10 04:31:11
@article{437a907c-3414-482f-8858-a7c89e52cacb,
  abstract     = {During kidney development a multitude of tubular portions is formed. Little knowledge is available by which cellbiological mechanism a cluster of embryonic cells is able to generate the threedimensional structure of a tubule. However, this know-how is most important in tissue engineering approaches such as the generation of an artificial kidney module or for the therapy of renal diseases using stem cells. To obtain cellbiological insights in parenchyme development we elaborate a new technique to generate under in vitro conditions renal tubules derived from the embryonic cortex of neonatal rabbits. The aim of the experiments is to establish a specific extracellular environment allowing optimal threedimensional development of renal tubules under serum-free culture conditions. In the present paper we demonstrate features of the renal stem cell niche and show their isolation as intact microcompartiments for advanced tissue culture. Perfusion culture in containers exhibiting a big dead fluid volume results in the development of a flat collecting duct (CD) epithelium at the surface of the tissue explant. In contrast, by fine-tuning the dead fluid volume within a perfusion culture container by an artificial interstitium made of a polyester fleece shows the generation of tubules. It is an up to date unknown morphogenetic information which tells the cells to form tubular structures. Copyright (C) 2004 S. Karger AG, Basel.},
  author       = {Minuth, W and Sorokin, Lydia and Schumacher, K},
  issn         = {1015-8987},
  keyword      = {perfusion culture,polyester fleece,artificial interstitium,tubules,renal stem cells,epithelium,tissue engineering},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4-6},
  pages        = {387--394},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry},
  title        = {Generation of renal tubules at the interface of an artificial interstitium},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000080348},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2004},
}