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Association between a polymorphism in the carboxyl ester lipase gene and serum cholesterol profile

Bengtsson-Ellmark, SH; Nilsson, J; Orho-Melander, Marju LU ; Dahlenborg, K; Groop, Leif LU and Bjursell, G (2004) In European Journal of Human Genetics 12(8). p.627-632
Abstract
Carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) is involved in the hydrolysis and absorption of dietary lipids, but it is largely unknown to what extent CEL could be involved in determining the serum lipid levels. The C-terminal part of CEL consists of a unique structure with proline-rich O-glycosylated repeats of 11 amino-acid residues each. The common variant of the human CEL gene contains 16 proline-rich repeats, but there is a high degree of polymorphism in the repeated region. While the biological function of the polymorphic repeat region is unknown, it has been suggested that it may be important for protein stability and/or secretion of the enzyme. Given that the polymorphism in the repeated region may affect the functionality of the protein, this study... (More)
Carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) is involved in the hydrolysis and absorption of dietary lipids, but it is largely unknown to what extent CEL could be involved in determining the serum lipid levels. The C-terminal part of CEL consists of a unique structure with proline-rich O-glycosylated repeats of 11 amino-acid residues each. The common variant of the human CEL gene contains 16 proline-rich repeats, but there is a high degree of polymorphism in the repeated region. While the biological function of the polymorphic repeat region is unknown, it has been suggested that it may be important for protein stability and/or secretion of the enzyme. Given that the polymorphism in the repeated region may affect the functionality of the protein, this study aimed to investigate whether the number of repeated units is correlated to serum lipid phenotype. Comparison of CEL repeat genotype and serum lipid phenotype revealed an association between the number of repeats and serum cholesterol profile. Individuals carrying at least one allele with fewer than the common 16 repeats had significantly lower total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels compared to individuals carrying two common alleles. This gives support to the notion that CEL may be involved in determining the plasma lipid composition. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
cholesterol, polymorphism, repeats, LDL, CEL, lipase
in
European Journal of Human Genetics
volume
12
issue
8
pages
627 - 632
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • wos:000222815000006
  • pmid:15114370
  • scopus:4444356276
ISSN
1476-5438
DOI
10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201204
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
059b7d20-0f8f-4965-bebd-5e43e1afa92f (old id 272499)
date added to LUP
2007-08-02 10:28:32
date last changed
2017-02-12 03:33:55
@article{059b7d20-0f8f-4965-bebd-5e43e1afa92f,
  abstract     = {Carboxyl ester lipase (CEL) is involved in the hydrolysis and absorption of dietary lipids, but it is largely unknown to what extent CEL could be involved in determining the serum lipid levels. The C-terminal part of CEL consists of a unique structure with proline-rich O-glycosylated repeats of 11 amino-acid residues each. The common variant of the human CEL gene contains 16 proline-rich repeats, but there is a high degree of polymorphism in the repeated region. While the biological function of the polymorphic repeat region is unknown, it has been suggested that it may be important for protein stability and/or secretion of the enzyme. Given that the polymorphism in the repeated region may affect the functionality of the protein, this study aimed to investigate whether the number of repeated units is correlated to serum lipid phenotype. Comparison of CEL repeat genotype and serum lipid phenotype revealed an association between the number of repeats and serum cholesterol profile. Individuals carrying at least one allele with fewer than the common 16 repeats had significantly lower total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels compared to individuals carrying two common alleles. This gives support to the notion that CEL may be involved in determining the plasma lipid composition.},
  author       = {Bengtsson-Ellmark, SH and Nilsson, J and Orho-Melander, Marju and Dahlenborg, K and Groop, Leif and Bjursell, G},
  issn         = {1476-5438},
  keyword      = {cholesterol,polymorphism,repeats,LDL,CEL,lipase},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {627--632},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {European Journal of Human Genetics},
  title        = {Association between a polymorphism in the carboxyl ester lipase gene and serum cholesterol profile},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.ejhg.5201204},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2004},
}