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Musculoskeletal pain and impact on performance in orchestra musicians and actors

Engquist, Karin LU ; Örbaek, Palle LU and Jakobsson, Kristina LU (2004) In Medical Problems of Performing Artists 19(2). p.55-61
Abstract
We studied the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and its impact on performance in orchestra musicians and in a reference group of actors, who share the mental stress in a performance situation, but without having the physical work load from an instrument. Swedish musicians (n = 103) from symphony and chamber orchestras and actors (n = 106) participated in a cross-sectional questionnaire study. Musculoskeletal pain was assessed by a further developed Standardized Nordic Questionnaire. The impact of pain on performance (pain affecting playing capacity, decreased playing time, and change of technique) and trouble-related sick leave also was assessed. Pain intensity was assessed by visual analogue scales. Musculoskeletal pain in the neck and... (More)
We studied the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and its impact on performance in orchestra musicians and in a reference group of actors, who share the mental stress in a performance situation, but without having the physical work load from an instrument. Swedish musicians (n = 103) from symphony and chamber orchestras and actors (n = 106) participated in a cross-sectional questionnaire study. Musculoskeletal pain was assessed by a further developed Standardized Nordic Questionnaire. The impact of pain on performance (pain affecting playing capacity, decreased playing time, and change of technique) and trouble-related sick leave also was assessed. Pain intensity was assessed by visual analogue scales. Musculoskeletal pain in the neck and shoulders was the most frequently reported problem, with similar prevalence among Musicians and actors, around 25% for present pain and 20% for chronic pain (1-year prevalence). Around 10% of the musicians and 5% of the actors reported pain in the hands. Oral pain was reported by 12% of the Musicians and 18% of the actors. The number of affected body regions and the intensity of pain were similar in the study groups. The musicians had an increased risk for pain affecting playing capacity. For the neck, the prevalence odds ratio (POR) was 3.0 (95% confidence interval 1.2-7.2; adjusted for age and gender). String instrumentalists had higher risk estimates than nonstring instrumentalists. A gender difference was not observed. Pain in the oral region affecting playing capacity was less common in musicians, with a prevalence odds ratio of 0.4 (95% confidence interval 0.1-0.8). Even though the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was similar in the two groups of performing artists, the consequences for the work situation were more serious among musicians. (Less)
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author
organization
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Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Medical Problems of Performing Artists
volume
19
issue
2
pages
55 - 61
publisher
Science and Medicine
external identifiers
  • wos:000222294500002
  • scopus:3042694363
ISSN
0885-1158
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
11e835b4-41fb-4984-a9ea-7df8e5a63bc2 (old id 273771)
alternative location
http://www.sciandmed.com/mppa/journalviewer.aspx?issue=1112&article=1644
date added to LUP
2007-10-22 14:32:29
date last changed
2017-01-08 04:56:31
@article{11e835b4-41fb-4984-a9ea-7df8e5a63bc2,
  abstract     = {We studied the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain and its impact on performance in orchestra musicians and in a reference group of actors, who share the mental stress in a performance situation, but without having the physical work load from an instrument. Swedish musicians (n = 103) from symphony and chamber orchestras and actors (n = 106) participated in a cross-sectional questionnaire study. Musculoskeletal pain was assessed by a further developed Standardized Nordic Questionnaire. The impact of pain on performance (pain affecting playing capacity, decreased playing time, and change of technique) and trouble-related sick leave also was assessed. Pain intensity was assessed by visual analogue scales. Musculoskeletal pain in the neck and shoulders was the most frequently reported problem, with similar prevalence among Musicians and actors, around 25% for present pain and 20% for chronic pain (1-year prevalence). Around 10% of the musicians and 5% of the actors reported pain in the hands. Oral pain was reported by 12% of the Musicians and 18% of the actors. The number of affected body regions and the intensity of pain were similar in the study groups. The musicians had an increased risk for pain affecting playing capacity. For the neck, the prevalence odds ratio (POR) was 3.0 (95% confidence interval 1.2-7.2; adjusted for age and gender). String instrumentalists had higher risk estimates than nonstring instrumentalists. A gender difference was not observed. Pain in the oral region affecting playing capacity was less common in musicians, with a prevalence odds ratio of 0.4 (95% confidence interval 0.1-0.8). Even though the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain was similar in the two groups of performing artists, the consequences for the work situation were more serious among musicians.},
  author       = {Engquist, Karin and Örbaek, Palle and Jakobsson, Kristina},
  issn         = {0885-1158},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {55--61},
  publisher    = {Science and Medicine},
  series       = {Medical Problems of Performing Artists},
  title        = {Musculoskeletal pain and impact on performance in orchestra musicians and actors},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2004},
}