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Pain and sensory dysfunction 6 to 12 months after inguinal herniotomy

Mikkelsen, T; Werner, Mads LU ; Lassen, B and Kehlet, H (2004) In Anesthesia and Analgesia 99(1). p.146-151
Abstract
Inguinal hernia repair is associated with a 5%-30% incidence of chronic pain, but the pathogenesis remains unknown. We therefore evaluated pain and sensory dysfunction by quantitative sensory testing 6-12 mo after open herniorrhaphy. Before sensory testing, all patients (n = 72) completed a short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire and a functional impairment questionnaire. Sensory dysfunction in the incisional area was evaluated by quantification of thermal and mechanical thresholds, by mechanical pain responses (von Frey/pressure algometry), and by areas of pinprick hypoesthesia and tactile allodynia. The incidence of chronic pain was 28% (20 of 72). Quantitative sensory testing and pressure algometry did not demonstrate differences between... (More)
Inguinal hernia repair is associated with a 5%-30% incidence of chronic pain, but the pathogenesis remains unknown. We therefore evaluated pain and sensory dysfunction by quantitative sensory testing 6-12 mo after open herniorrhaphy. Before sensory testing, all patients (n = 72) completed a short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire and a functional impairment questionnaire. Sensory dysfunction in the incisional area was evaluated by quantification of thermal and mechanical thresholds, by mechanical pain responses (von Frey/pressure algometry), and by areas of pinprick hypoesthesia and tactile allodynia. The incidence of chronic pain was 28% (20 of 72). Quantitative sensory testing and pressure algometry did not demonstrate differences between the pain and nonpain groups, except for a small but significant increase in pain response to von Frey hair and brush stimulation in the pain group. Hypoesthesia, or tactile allodynia, in the incisional area was observed in 51% (37 of 72) of the patients, but the incidence did not differ significantly between the pain group and the nonpain group (14 of 20 versus 23 of 52; P > 0.3). We concluded that cutaneous hypoesthesia, or tactile allodynia, is common after inguinal herniotomy but has a low specificity for chronic postherniotomy pain. Factors other than nerve damage maybe involved in the development of chronic postherniotomy pain. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Anesthesia and Analgesia
volume
99
issue
1
pages
146 - 151
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • wos:000222256400030
  • pmid:15281521
  • scopus:3042604945
ISSN
1526-7598
DOI
10.1213/01.ANE.0000115147.14626.C5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0b9ce1d6-6757-49b9-aeef-85083886f46c (old id 274428)
date added to LUP
2007-10-26 16:45:44
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:42:52
@article{0b9ce1d6-6757-49b9-aeef-85083886f46c,
  abstract     = {Inguinal hernia repair is associated with a 5%-30% incidence of chronic pain, but the pathogenesis remains unknown. We therefore evaluated pain and sensory dysfunction by quantitative sensory testing 6-12 mo after open herniorrhaphy. Before sensory testing, all patients (n = 72) completed a short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire and a functional impairment questionnaire. Sensory dysfunction in the incisional area was evaluated by quantification of thermal and mechanical thresholds, by mechanical pain responses (von Frey/pressure algometry), and by areas of pinprick hypoesthesia and tactile allodynia. The incidence of chronic pain was 28% (20 of 72). Quantitative sensory testing and pressure algometry did not demonstrate differences between the pain and nonpain groups, except for a small but significant increase in pain response to von Frey hair and brush stimulation in the pain group. Hypoesthesia, or tactile allodynia, in the incisional area was observed in 51% (37 of 72) of the patients, but the incidence did not differ significantly between the pain group and the nonpain group (14 of 20 versus 23 of 52; P > 0.3). We concluded that cutaneous hypoesthesia, or tactile allodynia, is common after inguinal herniotomy but has a low specificity for chronic postherniotomy pain. Factors other than nerve damage maybe involved in the development of chronic postherniotomy pain.},
  author       = {Mikkelsen, T and Werner, Mads and Lassen, B and Kehlet, H},
  issn         = {1526-7598},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {146--151},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Anesthesia and Analgesia},
  title        = {Pain and sensory dysfunction 6 to 12 months after inguinal herniotomy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/01.ANE.0000115147.14626.C5},
  volume       = {99},
  year         = {2004},
}