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Shifted dynamic interactions between subcortical nuclei and inferior frontal gyri during response preparation in persistent developmental stuttering

Metzger, F. Luise; Auer, Tibor; Helms, Gunther LU ; Paulus, Walter; Frahm, Jens; Sommer, Martin and Neef, Nicole E. (2017) In Brain Structure and Function p.1-18
Abstract

Persistent developmental stuttering is associated with basal ganglia dysfunction or dopamine dysregulation. Here, we studied whole-brain functional connectivity to test how basal ganglia structures coordinate and reorganize sensorimotor brain networks in stuttering. To this end, adults who stutter and fluent speakers (control participants) performed a response anticipation paradigm in the MRI scanner. The preparation of a manual Go/No-Go response reliably produced activity in the basal ganglia and thalamus and particularly in the substantia nigra. Strikingly, in adults who stutter, substantia nigra activity correlated positively with stuttering severity. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses yielded altered task-related network... (More)

Persistent developmental stuttering is associated with basal ganglia dysfunction or dopamine dysregulation. Here, we studied whole-brain functional connectivity to test how basal ganglia structures coordinate and reorganize sensorimotor brain networks in stuttering. To this end, adults who stutter and fluent speakers (control participants) performed a response anticipation paradigm in the MRI scanner. The preparation of a manual Go/No-Go response reliably produced activity in the basal ganglia and thalamus and particularly in the substantia nigra. Strikingly, in adults who stutter, substantia nigra activity correlated positively with stuttering severity. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses yielded altered task-related network formations in adults who stutter compared to fluent speakers. Specifically, in adults who stutter, the globus pallidus and the thalamus showed increased network synchronization with the inferior frontal gyrus. This implies dynamic shifts in the response preparation-related network organization through the basal ganglia in the context of a non-speech motor task in stuttering. Here we discuss current findings in the traditional framework of how D1 and D2 receptor activity shapes focused movement selection, thereby suggesting a disproportional involvement of the direct and the indirect pathway in stuttering.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
in press
keywords
Basal ganglia, Disinhibition, Inferior frontal gyrus, Persistent developmental stuttering, Response anticipation, Substantia nigra
in
Brain Structure and Function
pages
18 pages
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85025703583
ISSN
1863-2653
DOI
10.1007/s00429-017-1476-1
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
27d82c26-e36a-40f1-b285-846d4086f42f
date added to LUP
2017-08-24 16:44:29
date last changed
2018-01-07 12:16:08
@article{27d82c26-e36a-40f1-b285-846d4086f42f,
  abstract     = {<p>Persistent developmental stuttering is associated with basal ganglia dysfunction or dopamine dysregulation. Here, we studied whole-brain functional connectivity to test how basal ganglia structures coordinate and reorganize sensorimotor brain networks in stuttering. To this end, adults who stutter and fluent speakers (control participants) performed a response anticipation paradigm in the MRI scanner. The preparation of a manual Go/No-Go response reliably produced activity in the basal ganglia and thalamus and particularly in the substantia nigra. Strikingly, in adults who stutter, substantia nigra activity correlated positively with stuttering severity. Furthermore, functional connectivity analyses yielded altered task-related network formations in adults who stutter compared to fluent speakers. Specifically, in adults who stutter, the globus pallidus and the thalamus showed increased network synchronization with the inferior frontal gyrus. This implies dynamic shifts in the response preparation-related network organization through the basal ganglia in the context of a non-speech motor task in stuttering. Here we discuss current findings in the traditional framework of how D1 and D2 receptor activity shapes focused movement selection, thereby suggesting a disproportional involvement of the direct and the indirect pathway in stuttering.</p>},
  author       = {Metzger, F. Luise and Auer, Tibor and Helms, Gunther and Paulus, Walter and Frahm, Jens and Sommer, Martin and Neef, Nicole E.},
  issn         = {1863-2653},
  keyword      = {Basal ganglia,Disinhibition,Inferior frontal gyrus,Persistent developmental stuttering,Response anticipation,Substantia nigra},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {07},
  pages        = {1--18},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Brain Structure and Function},
  title        = {Shifted dynamic interactions between subcortical nuclei and inferior frontal gyri during response preparation in persistent developmental stuttering},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00429-017-1476-1},
  year         = {2017},
}