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Towards clinical grating-interferometry mammography

Arboleda, Carolina; Wang, Zhentian; Jefimovs, Konstantins; Koehler, Thomas; Van Stevendaal, Udo; Kuhn, Norbert; David, Bernd; Prevrhal, Sven; Lång, Kristina LU and Forte, Serafino, et al. (2019) In European Radiology p.1-7
Abstract

Objectives: Grating-interferometry-based mammography (GIM) might facilitate breast cancer detection, as several research works have demonstrated in a pre-clinical setting, since it is able to provide attenuation, differential phase contrast, and scattering images simultaneously. In order to translate this technique to the clinics, it has to be adapted to cover a large field-of-view within a clinically acceptable exposure time and radiation dose. Methods: We set up a grating interferometer that fits into a standard mammography system and fulfilled the aforementioned conditions. Here, we present the first mastectomy images acquired with this experimental device. Results and conclusion: Our system performs at a mean glandular dose of 1.6... (More)

Objectives: Grating-interferometry-based mammography (GIM) might facilitate breast cancer detection, as several research works have demonstrated in a pre-clinical setting, since it is able to provide attenuation, differential phase contrast, and scattering images simultaneously. In order to translate this technique to the clinics, it has to be adapted to cover a large field-of-view within a clinically acceptable exposure time and radiation dose. Methods: We set up a grating interferometer that fits into a standard mammography system and fulfilled the aforementioned conditions. Here, we present the first mastectomy images acquired with this experimental device. Results and conclusion: Our system performs at a mean glandular dose of 1.6 mGy for a 5-cm-thick, 18%-dense breast, and a field-of-view of 26 × 21 cm2. It seems to be well-suited as basis for a clinical-environment device. Further, dark-field signals seem to support an improved lesion visualization. Evidently, the effective impact of such indications must be evaluated and quantified within the context of a proper reader study. Key Points: • Grating-interferometry-based mammography (GIM) might facilitate breast cancer detection, since it is sensitive to refraction and scattering and thus provides additional tissue information. • The most straightforward way to do grating-interferometry in the clinics is to modify a standard mammography device. • In a first approximation, the doses given with this technique seem to be similar to those of conventional mammography.

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publication status
published
subject
keywords
Interferometry, Mammography, Phase contrast
in
European Radiology
pages
1 - 7
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85071290540
ISSN
0938-7994
DOI
10.1007/s00330-019-06362-x
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
27ffd3c5-2df6-4ef9-b2b9-e945c8bf4c63
date added to LUP
2019-09-03 13:58:09
date last changed
2019-10-01 03:46:44
@article{27ffd3c5-2df6-4ef9-b2b9-e945c8bf4c63,
  abstract     = {<p>Objectives: Grating-interferometry-based mammography (GIM) might facilitate breast cancer detection, as several research works have demonstrated in a pre-clinical setting, since it is able to provide attenuation, differential phase contrast, and scattering images simultaneously. In order to translate this technique to the clinics, it has to be adapted to cover a large field-of-view within a clinically acceptable exposure time and radiation dose. Methods: We set up a grating interferometer that fits into a standard mammography system and fulfilled the aforementioned conditions. Here, we present the first mastectomy images acquired with this experimental device. Results and conclusion: Our system performs at a mean glandular dose of 1.6 mGy for a 5-cm-thick, 18%-dense breast, and a field-of-view of 26 × 21 cm2. It seems to be well-suited as basis for a clinical-environment device. Further, dark-field signals seem to support an improved lesion visualization. Evidently, the effective impact of such indications must be evaluated and quantified within the context of a proper reader study. Key Points: • Grating-interferometry-based mammography (GIM) might facilitate breast cancer detection, since it is sensitive to refraction and scattering and thus provides additional tissue information. • The most straightforward way to do grating-interferometry in the clinics is to modify a standard mammography device. • In a first approximation, the doses given with this technique seem to be similar to those of conventional mammography.</p>},
  author       = {Arboleda, Carolina and Wang, Zhentian and Jefimovs, Konstantins and Koehler, Thomas and Van Stevendaal, Udo and Kuhn, Norbert and David, Bernd and Prevrhal, Sven and Lång, Kristina and Forte, Serafino and Kubik-Huch, Rahel Antonia and Leo, Cornelia and Singer, Gad and Marcon, Magda and Boss, Andreas and Roessl, Ewald and Stampanoni, Marco},
  issn         = {0938-7994},
  keyword      = {Interferometry,Mammography,Phase contrast},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {08},
  pages        = {1--7},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {European Radiology},
  title        = {Towards clinical grating-interferometry mammography},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00330-019-06362-x},
  year         = {2019},
}