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Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among adult dyspeptic patients in Ethiopia

Asrat, D; Nilsson, Ingrid LU ; Mengistu, Y; Ashenafi, S; Ayenew, K; Abu Al-Soud, Waleed LU ; Wadström, Torkel LU and Kassa, E (2004) In Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology 98(2). p.181-189
Abstract
In developing countries such as Ethiopia, where chronic gastritis and peptic-ulcer disease are the most common endoscopic findings, it is important to study the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases. Both invasive and non-invasive diagnostic methods were therefore used to investigate 300, consecutive, adult patients with dyspepsia, from the gastrointestinal clinic of Tikur Anbassa University Hospital, Addis Ababa. The apparent overall prevalence of H. pylori infection varied according to the detection method employed. Culture revealed H. pylori in only 69%, of the patients but this pathogen appeared more common when rapid urease tests (71%), PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis (91%),... (More)
In developing countries such as Ethiopia, where chronic gastritis and peptic-ulcer disease are the most common endoscopic findings, it is important to study the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases. Both invasive and non-invasive diagnostic methods were therefore used to investigate 300, consecutive, adult patients with dyspepsia, from the gastrointestinal clinic of Tikur Anbassa University Hospital, Addis Ababa. The apparent overall prevalence of H. pylori infection varied according to the detection method employed. Culture revealed H. pylori in only 69%, of the patients but this pathogen appeared more common when rapid urease tests (71%), PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis (91%), histopathology (81%), silver staining (75%) or stool-antigen tests (81%) were employed. Antibodies to H. pylori were detected, both by enzyme immuno-assay (EIA) and immunoblotting, in approximately 80%, of the patients, whether the antigens used were of a reference strain or from a local isolate of H. pylon. When some of the EIA-positive and EIA-negative sera were cross-absorbed with antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and re-tested by EIA, the H. pylori-positive sera remained positive and the negative sera remained negative. Dyspeptic patients in Ethiopia, like most of those previously observed elsewhere in Africa, are often infected with H. pylon. It is important that the management of these patients should not be hampered by the misinterpretation of the African epidemiology of this pathogen. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology
volume
98
issue
2
pages
181 - 189
publisher
Maney Publishing
external identifiers
  • wos:000220668200009
  • pmid:15035728
  • scopus:1642369559
ISSN
1364-8594
DOI
10.1179/000349804225003190
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
982e4013-2af6-4a71-b339-e35a71449f34 (old id 283088)
date added to LUP
2007-10-16 14:12:33
date last changed
2017-12-10 03:48:17
@article{982e4013-2af6-4a71-b339-e35a71449f34,
  abstract     = {In developing countries such as Ethiopia, where chronic gastritis and peptic-ulcer disease are the most common endoscopic findings, it is important to study the association between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroduodenal diseases. Both invasive and non-invasive diagnostic methods were therefore used to investigate 300, consecutive, adult patients with dyspepsia, from the gastrointestinal clinic of Tikur Anbassa University Hospital, Addis Ababa. The apparent overall prevalence of H. pylori infection varied according to the detection method employed. Culture revealed H. pylori in only 69%, of the patients but this pathogen appeared more common when rapid urease tests (71%), PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis (91%), histopathology (81%), silver staining (75%) or stool-antigen tests (81%) were employed. Antibodies to H. pylori were detected, both by enzyme immuno-assay (EIA) and immunoblotting, in approximately 80%, of the patients, whether the antigens used were of a reference strain or from a local isolate of H. pylon. When some of the EIA-positive and EIA-negative sera were cross-absorbed with antigens of Campylobacter jejuni and re-tested by EIA, the H. pylori-positive sera remained positive and the negative sera remained negative. Dyspeptic patients in Ethiopia, like most of those previously observed elsewhere in Africa, are often infected with H. pylon. It is important that the management of these patients should not be hampered by the misinterpretation of the African epidemiology of this pathogen.},
  author       = {Asrat, D and Nilsson, Ingrid and Mengistu, Y and Ashenafi, S and Ayenew, K and Abu Al-Soud, Waleed and Wadström, Torkel and Kassa, E},
  issn         = {1364-8594},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {181--189},
  publisher    = {Maney Publishing},
  series       = {Annals of Tropical Medicine and Parasitology},
  title        = {Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection among adult dyspeptic patients in Ethiopia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1179/000349804225003190},
  volume       = {98},
  year         = {2004},
}