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Increased prevalence of perennial allergic rhinitis in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

Canova, C R; Downs, S H; Knoblauch, A; Andersson, Morgan LU ; Tamm, M and Leuppi, J D (2004) In Respiration 71(2). p.138-143
Abstract
Background: Impaired nasal breathing is a risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine whether atopy to perennial allergens and existence of perennial allergic rhinitis was a risk factor for OSAS. Methods: In a case-control study, we compared the proportions of OSAS patients with atopy to perennial allergens and perennial allergic rhinitis to the proportions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Seventy-two OSAS patients (mean age 60.7 years; 79.4% male) and 44 COPD patients (mean age 63.6 years; 88.6% male) were selected from a hospital outpatients' clinic in Switzerland. All patients completed a respiratory symptom questionnaire, performed spirometry... (More)
Background: Impaired nasal breathing is a risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine whether atopy to perennial allergens and existence of perennial allergic rhinitis was a risk factor for OSAS. Methods: In a case-control study, we compared the proportions of OSAS patients with atopy to perennial allergens and perennial allergic rhinitis to the proportions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Seventy-two OSAS patients (mean age 60.7 years; 79.4% male) and 44 COPD patients (mean age 63.6 years; 88.6% male) were selected from a hospital outpatients' clinic in Switzerland. All patients completed a respiratory symptom questionnaire, performed spirometry and had a skin prick test for atopy. Results: OSAS patients were significantly heavier than COPD patients (BMI 32.4 +/- (SD) 6.6 vs. 29.2 +/- 6.6 kg/m(2), p = 0.04) and had a better lung function than COPD patients (FEV1% predicted 91.3 +/- 19.2 vs. 51.6 +/- 18.9%, p < 0.001). Patients with OSAS were more likely to be sensitized to perennial allergens such as house dust mite (23.6 vs. 4.5%, p = 0.009) and dog (18 vs. 4.5%, p = 0.04) than the COPD patients. Perennial allergic rhinitis ( having nose problems [ nasal obstruction and/or runny nose and/or sneezing] all year and being atopic to at least one perennial allergen) was reported in 11% of OSAS patients but in only 2.3% of COPD patients (p = 0.15). Conclusion: We conclude that subjects with OSAS may have an increased risk of being allergic to perennial allergens and suffer from perennial rhinitis. Awareness of this risk may have important consideration in the clinical situation. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
COPD, perennial allergic rhinitis, obstructive sleep apnea
in
Respiration
volume
71
issue
2
pages
138 - 143
publisher
Karger
external identifiers
  • wos:000220301500005
  • scopus:1942531462
ISSN
1423-0356
DOI
10.1159/000076674
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
0f56ff3a-dc08-4587-9490-f22118b73b4e (old id 284173)
date added to LUP
2007-10-17 14:58:54
date last changed
2017-10-22 04:35:47
@article{0f56ff3a-dc08-4587-9490-f22118b73b4e,
  abstract     = {Background: Impaired nasal breathing is a risk factor for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine whether atopy to perennial allergens and existence of perennial allergic rhinitis was a risk factor for OSAS. Methods: In a case-control study, we compared the proportions of OSAS patients with atopy to perennial allergens and perennial allergic rhinitis to the proportions in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Seventy-two OSAS patients (mean age 60.7 years; 79.4% male) and 44 COPD patients (mean age 63.6 years; 88.6% male) were selected from a hospital outpatients' clinic in Switzerland. All patients completed a respiratory symptom questionnaire, performed spirometry and had a skin prick test for atopy. Results: OSAS patients were significantly heavier than COPD patients (BMI 32.4 +/- (SD) 6.6 vs. 29.2 +/- 6.6 kg/m(2), p = 0.04) and had a better lung function than COPD patients (FEV1% predicted 91.3 +/- 19.2 vs. 51.6 +/- 18.9%, p &lt; 0.001). Patients with OSAS were more likely to be sensitized to perennial allergens such as house dust mite (23.6 vs. 4.5%, p = 0.009) and dog (18 vs. 4.5%, p = 0.04) than the COPD patients. Perennial allergic rhinitis ( having nose problems [ nasal obstruction and/or runny nose and/or sneezing] all year and being atopic to at least one perennial allergen) was reported in 11% of OSAS patients but in only 2.3% of COPD patients (p = 0.15). Conclusion: We conclude that subjects with OSAS may have an increased risk of being allergic to perennial allergens and suffer from perennial rhinitis. Awareness of this risk may have important consideration in the clinical situation.},
  author       = {Canova, C R and Downs, S H and Knoblauch, A and Andersson, Morgan and Tamm, M and Leuppi, J D},
  issn         = {1423-0356},
  keyword      = {COPD,perennial allergic rhinitis,obstructive sleep apnea},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {138--143},
  publisher    = {Karger},
  series       = {Respiration},
  title        = {Increased prevalence of perennial allergic rhinitis in patients with obstructive sleep apnea},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000076674},
  volume       = {71},
  year         = {2004},
}