Advanced

Paternal and maternal age as risk factors for psychosis: findings from Denmark, Sweden and Australia

El-Saadi, O; Pedersen, CB; McNeil, Thomas LU ; Saha, S; Welham, J; O'Callaghan, E; Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth LU ; Chant, D; Mortensen, PB and McGrath, J (2004) In Schizophrenia Research 67(2-3). p.227-236
Abstract
Background: While the association between increased maternal age and congenital disorders has long been recognized, the offspring of older fathers are also at increased risk of congenital disorders related to DNA errors during spermatogenesis. Recent studies have drawn attention to an association between increased paternal age and increased risk of schizophrenia. The aim of the current study was to examine both paternal and maternal age as risk factors for the broader category of psychosis. Method: We used data from three sources examining psychosis: a population-based cohort study (Denmark), and two case-control studies (Sweden and Australia). Results: When controlling for the effect of maternal age, increased paternal age was... (More)
Background: While the association between increased maternal age and congenital disorders has long been recognized, the offspring of older fathers are also at increased risk of congenital disorders related to DNA errors during spermatogenesis. Recent studies have drawn attention to an association between increased paternal age and increased risk of schizophrenia. The aim of the current study was to examine both paternal and maternal age as risk factors for the broader category of psychosis. Method: We used data from three sources examining psychosis: a population-based cohort study (Denmark), and two case-control studies (Sweden and Australia). Results: When controlling for the effect of maternal age, increased paternal age was significantly associated with increased risk of psychosis in the Danish and Swedish studies. The Australian study found no association between adjusted paternal age and risk of psychosis. When controlling for the effect of paternal age, younger maternal a-e was associated with an increased risk of psychoses in the Danish study alone. Conclusions: The offspring of older fathers are at increased risk of developing psychosis. The role of paternally derived mutations and/or psychosocial factors associated with older paternal age warrants further research. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
congenital disorders, paternal and maternal age, psychosis
in
Schizophrenia Research
volume
67
issue
2-3
pages
227 - 236
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000220007500013
  • pmid:14984882
  • scopus:10744220971
ISSN
0920-9964
DOI
10.1016/S0920-9964(03)00100-2
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
bf5972fe-f58e-406d-b4cd-d03b539f08b7 (old id 285025)
date added to LUP
2007-10-22 08:22:20
date last changed
2017-08-20 03:38:05
@article{bf5972fe-f58e-406d-b4cd-d03b539f08b7,
  abstract     = {Background: While the association between increased maternal age and congenital disorders has long been recognized, the offspring of older fathers are also at increased risk of congenital disorders related to DNA errors during spermatogenesis. Recent studies have drawn attention to an association between increased paternal age and increased risk of schizophrenia. The aim of the current study was to examine both paternal and maternal age as risk factors for the broader category of psychosis. Method: We used data from three sources examining psychosis: a population-based cohort study (Denmark), and two case-control studies (Sweden and Australia). Results: When controlling for the effect of maternal age, increased paternal age was significantly associated with increased risk of psychosis in the Danish and Swedish studies. The Australian study found no association between adjusted paternal age and risk of psychosis. When controlling for the effect of paternal age, younger maternal a-e was associated with an increased risk of psychoses in the Danish study alone. Conclusions: The offspring of older fathers are at increased risk of developing psychosis. The role of paternally derived mutations and/or psychosocial factors associated with older paternal age warrants further research. (C) 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {El-Saadi, O and Pedersen, CB and McNeil, Thomas and Saha, S and Welham, J and O'Callaghan, E and Cantor-Graae, Elizabeth and Chant, D and Mortensen, PB and McGrath, J},
  issn         = {0920-9964},
  keyword      = {congenital disorders,paternal and maternal age,psychosis},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2-3},
  pages        = {227--236},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Schizophrenia Research},
  title        = {Paternal and maternal age as risk factors for psychosis: findings from Denmark, Sweden and Australia},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0920-9964(03)00100-2},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2004},
}