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Development of a pressure-measuring device to optimize compression treatment of lymphedema and evaluation of change in garment pressure with simulated wear and tear.

Brorson, Håkan LU ; Hansson, Emma LU ; Jense, Erik and Freccero, Carolin LU (2012) In Lymphatic Research and Biology 10(2). p.74-80
Abstract
The use of compression garments in treating lymphedema following treatment of genital (penis, testes, uterus, cervical) and breast cancer treatment is a well-established practice. Although compression garments are classified in compression classes, little is known about the actual subgarment pressure exerted along the extremity. The aims of this study were to establish an in vitro method for measuring subgarment pressure along the extremity and to analyze initial and over time subgarment pressure of compression garments from three manufacturers. The measurements were performed with I-scan(®) (Tekscan Inc.) pressure measuring equipment once a week during a period of 4 weeks. Wear and tear was simulated by washing and putting on the garments... (More)
The use of compression garments in treating lymphedema following treatment of genital (penis, testes, uterus, cervical) and breast cancer treatment is a well-established practice. Although compression garments are classified in compression classes, little is known about the actual subgarment pressure exerted along the extremity. The aims of this study were to establish an in vitro method for measuring subgarment pressure along the extremity and to analyze initial and over time subgarment pressure of compression garments from three manufacturers. The measurements were performed with I-scan(®) (Tekscan Inc.) pressure measuring equipment once a week during a period of 4 weeks. Wear and tear was simulated by washing and putting on the garments on plastic legs every day. There was a statistically significant difference between the garments of some of manufacturers. There was no difference between garments from the same manufacturer. No significant decrease of subgarment pressure was observed during the trial period. The study demonstrated that Tekscan pressure-measuring equipment could measure subgarment pressure in vitro. The results may indicate that there was a difference in subgarment pressure exerted by garments from different manufacturers and that there was no clear decrease in subgarment pressure during the first four weeks of usage. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Lymphatic Research and Biology
volume
10
issue
2
pages
74 - 80
publisher
Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000305865400005
  • pmid:22720662
  • scopus:84862870158
ISSN
1539-6851
DOI
10.1089/lrb.2012.0003
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3188efb0-f816-4948-89f9-cb4d12dcfc28 (old id 2859154)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22720662?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-07-04 18:26:45
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:52:09
@article{3188efb0-f816-4948-89f9-cb4d12dcfc28,
  abstract     = {The use of compression garments in treating lymphedema following treatment of genital (penis, testes, uterus, cervical) and breast cancer treatment is a well-established practice. Although compression garments are classified in compression classes, little is known about the actual subgarment pressure exerted along the extremity. The aims of this study were to establish an in vitro method for measuring subgarment pressure along the extremity and to analyze initial and over time subgarment pressure of compression garments from three manufacturers. The measurements were performed with I-scan(®) (Tekscan Inc.) pressure measuring equipment once a week during a period of 4 weeks. Wear and tear was simulated by washing and putting on the garments on plastic legs every day. There was a statistically significant difference between the garments of some of manufacturers. There was no difference between garments from the same manufacturer. No significant decrease of subgarment pressure was observed during the trial period. The study demonstrated that Tekscan pressure-measuring equipment could measure subgarment pressure in vitro. The results may indicate that there was a difference in subgarment pressure exerted by garments from different manufacturers and that there was no clear decrease in subgarment pressure during the first four weeks of usage.},
  author       = {Brorson, Håkan and Hansson, Emma and Jense, Erik and Freccero, Carolin},
  issn         = {1539-6851},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {74--80},
  publisher    = {Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.},
  series       = {Lymphatic Research and Biology},
  title        = {Development of a pressure-measuring device to optimize compression treatment of lymphedema and evaluation of change in garment pressure with simulated wear and tear.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/lrb.2012.0003},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2012},
}