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The use of propofol sedation in a paediatric intensive care unit.

Svensson, Marie-Louise and Lindberg, Lars LU (2012) In Nursing in critical care 17(4). p.198-203
Abstract
Background:

The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate and report the experience of the use of continuous intravenous propofol sedation in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU).



Methods:

All children younger than 16 years who were admitted to the PICU at a University Hospital for slightly more than a year and received propofol infusion were included prospectively and data were recorded before and within 6 h after completion of the propofol infusion.



Results:

A total of 174 out of 955 children (18·2%) received propofol infusion for sedation. The median age was 2 years 10 months (range: 2 months to 16 years), duration of propofol infusion 13 h (range: 1·6-179 h)... (More)
Background:

The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate and report the experience of the use of continuous intravenous propofol sedation in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU).



Methods:

All children younger than 16 years who were admitted to the PICU at a University Hospital for slightly more than a year and received propofol infusion were included prospectively and data were recorded before and within 6 h after completion of the propofol infusion.



Results:

A total of 174 out of 955 children (18·2%) received propofol infusion for sedation. The median age was 2 years 10 months (range: 2 months to 16 years), duration of propofol infusion 13 h (range: 1·6-179 h) and dose of propofol 2·9 mg/kg/h (range: 0·3-6·5 mg/kg/h). No one developed signs of the propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS). Neither dose >3 mg/kg/h, duration of infusion >48 h nor both were found to be related to adverse metabolic derangements or circulatory failure. Eight children increased their lactate concentration ≥1·8 mmol/L during propofol infusion. All had a favourable outcome. One child who had received propofol infusion for 10 h died, but this occurred 14 h after the infusion ceased and was without doubt attributed to a multiple organ failure not related to the propofol infusion.



Conclusion:

Propofol infusion was used in this population at low risk of PRIS with no metabolic or circulatory adverse effects. These findings indicate that the occurrence of adverse effects may not be directly related to dose or duration of infusion, but emphasizes the risk that sporadic factors may be involved, such as genetic mutations. Guidelines are presented. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Nursing in critical care
volume
17
issue
4
pages
198 - 203
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000305471500007
  • pmid:22698162
  • scopus:84862507878
ISSN
1478-5153
DOI
10.1111/j.1478-5153.2012.00488.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
77f3cf45-b291-4f48-80a2-a25b642b0dac (old id 2859423)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22698162?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-07-04 17:31:15
date last changed
2017-04-23 04:34:53
@article{77f3cf45-b291-4f48-80a2-a25b642b0dac,
  abstract     = {Background: <br/><br>
The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate and report the experience of the use of continuous intravenous propofol sedation in a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods: <br/><br>
All children younger than 16 years who were admitted to the PICU at a University Hospital for slightly more than a year and received propofol infusion were included prospectively and data were recorded before and within 6 h after completion of the propofol infusion. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results: <br/><br>
A total of 174 out of 955 children (18·2%) received propofol infusion for sedation. The median age was 2 years 10 months (range: 2 months to 16 years), duration of propofol infusion 13 h (range: 1·6-179 h) and dose of propofol 2·9 mg/kg/h (range: 0·3-6·5 mg/kg/h). No one developed signs of the propofol infusion syndrome (PRIS). Neither dose &gt;3 mg/kg/h, duration of infusion &gt;48 h nor both were found to be related to adverse metabolic derangements or circulatory failure. Eight children increased their lactate concentration ≥1·8 mmol/L during propofol infusion. All had a favourable outcome. One child who had received propofol infusion for 10 h died, but this occurred 14 h after the infusion ceased and was without doubt attributed to a multiple organ failure not related to the propofol infusion. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusion: <br/><br>
Propofol infusion was used in this population at low risk of PRIS with no metabolic or circulatory adverse effects. These findings indicate that the occurrence of adverse effects may not be directly related to dose or duration of infusion, but emphasizes the risk that sporadic factors may be involved, such as genetic mutations. Guidelines are presented.},
  author       = {Svensson, Marie-Louise and Lindberg, Lars},
  issn         = {1478-5153},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {198--203},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Nursing in critical care},
  title        = {The use of propofol sedation in a paediatric intensive care unit.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1478-5153.2012.00488.x},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2012},
}