Advanced

S100 protein in serum as a prognostic marker for cerebral injury in term newborn infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy

Thorngren-Jerneck, Kristina LU ; Alling, Christer LU ; Herbst, Andreas LU ; Amer-Wåhlin, Isis LU and Marsal, Karel LU (2004) In Pediatric Research 55(3). p.406-412
Abstract
The astroglial protein S100 is an established biochemical marker for CNS injury in the adult. The aim was to investigate whether S100 in serum is a prognostic marker of cerebral injury in term newborn infants, with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) after perinatal asphyxia. Serum S100 was measured on postnatal days 1-4 in 62 term infants with birth asphyxia. The infants were classified for HIE and had follow-up for at least 18 mo. Infants with moderate and severe HIE had significantly higher S100 levels on postnatal day 1 (p = 0.031) and day 2 (p = 0.008) than infants with mild or no HIE. The levels of S100 decreased on days 2 and 3 in all infants with HIE. The median S 100 level on postnatal day I was higher in nine infants who died... (More)
The astroglial protein S100 is an established biochemical marker for CNS injury in the adult. The aim was to investigate whether S100 in serum is a prognostic marker of cerebral injury in term newborn infants, with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) after perinatal asphyxia. Serum S100 was measured on postnatal days 1-4 in 62 term infants with birth asphyxia. The infants were classified for HIE and had follow-up for at least 18 mo. Infants with moderate and severe HIE had significantly higher S100 levels on postnatal day 1 (p = 0.031) and day 2 (p = 0.008) than infants with mild or no HIE. The levels of S100 decreased on days 2 and 3 in all infants with HIE. The median S 100 level on postnatal day I was higher in nine infants who died neonatally and in 10 infants who developed cerebral palsy (CP), compared with 43 infants with no signs of impairment at follow up, 14.0 (0.5-60.0) mug/L, 20.7 (0.2-64.0) mug/L and 5.5 (0.7-120.0) mug/L, respectively. A level of S100 above 12 mug/L the first day of life was significantly more trequent in infants who died or developed CP than in infants with no impairment at follow LIP (P = 0.02). Increased S100 levels were significantly inversely correlated with perinatal pH in the infants and associated with abnormal CTG at admission to the labor ward. Early determination of serum S100 may reflect the extent of brain damage in infants with HIE after asphyxia. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Pediatric Research
volume
55
issue
3
pages
406 - 412
publisher
International Pediatric Foundation Inc.
external identifiers
  • wos:000189111000010
  • pmid:14630979
  • scopus:1242342196
ISSN
1530-0447
DOI
10.1203/01.PDR.0000106806.75086.D3
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
f6d84098-33ec-4ee2-875c-3c2e63681c85 (old id 286280)
alternative location
http://www.pedresearch.org/pt/re/pedresearch/fulltext.00006450-200403000-00010.htm
date added to LUP
2007-11-03 09:41:36
date last changed
2017-10-29 03:45:20
@article{f6d84098-33ec-4ee2-875c-3c2e63681c85,
  abstract     = {The astroglial protein S100 is an established biochemical marker for CNS injury in the adult. The aim was to investigate whether S100 in serum is a prognostic marker of cerebral injury in term newborn infants, with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) after perinatal asphyxia. Serum S100 was measured on postnatal days 1-4 in 62 term infants with birth asphyxia. The infants were classified for HIE and had follow-up for at least 18 mo. Infants with moderate and severe HIE had significantly higher S100 levels on postnatal day 1 (p = 0.031) and day 2 (p = 0.008) than infants with mild or no HIE. The levels of S100 decreased on days 2 and 3 in all infants with HIE. The median S 100 level on postnatal day I was higher in nine infants who died neonatally and in 10 infants who developed cerebral palsy (CP), compared with 43 infants with no signs of impairment at follow up, 14.0 (0.5-60.0) mug/L, 20.7 (0.2-64.0) mug/L and 5.5 (0.7-120.0) mug/L, respectively. A level of S100 above 12 mug/L the first day of life was significantly more trequent in infants who died or developed CP than in infants with no impairment at follow LIP (P = 0.02). Increased S100 levels were significantly inversely correlated with perinatal pH in the infants and associated with abnormal CTG at admission to the labor ward. Early determination of serum S100 may reflect the extent of brain damage in infants with HIE after asphyxia.},
  author       = {Thorngren-Jerneck, Kristina and Alling, Christer and Herbst, Andreas and Amer-Wåhlin, Isis and Marsal, Karel},
  issn         = {1530-0447},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {406--412},
  publisher    = {International Pediatric Foundation Inc.},
  series       = {Pediatric Research},
  title        = {S100 protein in serum as a prognostic marker for cerebral injury in term newborn infants with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1203/01.PDR.0000106806.75086.D3},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2004},
}