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Cancer-related pain in palliative care: patients' perceptions of pain management

Bostrom, B; Sandh, M; Lundberg, Dag LU and Fridlund, Bengt LU (2004) In Journal of Advanced Nursing 45(4). p.410-419
Abstract
Background. Pain is still a significant problem for many patients with cancer, despite numerous, clear and concise guidelines for the treatment of cancer-related pain. The impact of pain cognition on patients' experiences of cancer-related pain remains relatively unexplored. Aim. The aim of this study was to describe how patients with cancer-related pain in palliative care perceive the management of their pain. Methods. Thirty patients were strategically selected for interviews with open-ended questions, designed to explore the pain and pain management related to their cancer. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Findings. Patients described 10 different perceptions of pain and pain management summarized in the... (More)
Background. Pain is still a significant problem for many patients with cancer, despite numerous, clear and concise guidelines for the treatment of cancer-related pain. The impact of pain cognition on patients' experiences of cancer-related pain remains relatively unexplored. Aim. The aim of this study was to describe how patients with cancer-related pain in palliative care perceive the management of their pain. Methods. Thirty patients were strategically selected for interviews with open-ended questions, designed to explore the pain and pain management related to their cancer. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Findings. Patients described 10 different perceptions of pain and pain management summarized in the three categories: communication, planning and trust. In terms of communication, patients expressed a need for an open and honest dialogue with health care professionals about all problems concerning pain. Patients expressed an urgent need for planning of their pain treatment including all caring activities around them. When they felt trust in the health care organization as a whole, and in nurses and physicians in particular, they described improved ability and willingness to participate in pain management. While the findings are limited to patients in palliative care, questions are raised about others with cancer-related pain without access to a palliative care team. Conclusion. The opportunity for patients to discuss pain and its treatment seems to have occurred late in the course of disease, mostly not until coming in contact with a palliative care team. They expressed a wish to be pain-free, or attain as much pain relief as possible, with as few side effects as possible. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
trust, planning, nursing, phenomenography, perceptions, pain management, cancer-related pain, communication
in
Journal of Advanced Nursing
volume
45
issue
4
pages
410 - 419
publisher
Wiley-Blackwell
external identifiers
  • wos:000188720900008
  • scopus:1342343180
ISSN
0309-2402
DOI
10.1046/j.1365-2648.2003.02924.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
dc5f1af0-573f-41f5-a758-59ec6a0d4bb0 (old id 288694)
date added to LUP
2007-10-17 11:16:17
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:46:48
@article{dc5f1af0-573f-41f5-a758-59ec6a0d4bb0,
  abstract     = {Background. Pain is still a significant problem for many patients with cancer, despite numerous, clear and concise guidelines for the treatment of cancer-related pain. The impact of pain cognition on patients' experiences of cancer-related pain remains relatively unexplored. Aim. The aim of this study was to describe how patients with cancer-related pain in palliative care perceive the management of their pain. Methods. Thirty patients were strategically selected for interviews with open-ended questions, designed to explore the pain and pain management related to their cancer. The interviews were analysed using a phenomenographic approach. Findings. Patients described 10 different perceptions of pain and pain management summarized in the three categories: communication, planning and trust. In terms of communication, patients expressed a need for an open and honest dialogue with health care professionals about all problems concerning pain. Patients expressed an urgent need for planning of their pain treatment including all caring activities around them. When they felt trust in the health care organization as a whole, and in nurses and physicians in particular, they described improved ability and willingness to participate in pain management. While the findings are limited to patients in palliative care, questions are raised about others with cancer-related pain without access to a palliative care team. Conclusion. The opportunity for patients to discuss pain and its treatment seems to have occurred late in the course of disease, mostly not until coming in contact with a palliative care team. They expressed a wish to be pain-free, or attain as much pain relief as possible, with as few side effects as possible.},
  author       = {Bostrom, B and Sandh, M and Lundberg, Dag and Fridlund, Bengt},
  issn         = {0309-2402},
  keyword      = {trust,planning,nursing,phenomenography,perceptions,pain management,cancer-related pain,communication},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {410--419},
  publisher    = {Wiley-Blackwell},
  series       = {Journal of Advanced Nursing},
  title        = {Cancer-related pain in palliative care: patients' perceptions of pain management},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1365-2648.2003.02924.x},
  volume       = {45},
  year         = {2004},
}