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Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in response to skull taps for patients with vestibular neuritis

Brantberg, K; Tribukait, A and Fransson, Per-Anders LU (2003) In Journal of Vestibular Research 13(2-3). p.121-130
Abstract
In recent years it has been demonstrated that loud clicks generate short latency vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP). It has also been demonstrated that skull tap stimulation evokes similar VEMP. In the present study, the differences between the click-induced and the skull-tap induced VEMP were studied in 18 patients at onset of vestibular neuritis. Gentle skull taps were delivered manually above each ear on the side of the skull and on the forehead midline. The muscular responses were recorded over both sternocleidomastoid muscles using skin electrodes. Abnormal skull tap VEMP were found in the majority of the patients (10/18, 56%). However, only 4/18 (22%) showed asymmetry in the click-induced VEMP. The high percentage of... (More)
In recent years it has been demonstrated that loud clicks generate short latency vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP). It has also been demonstrated that skull tap stimulation evokes similar VEMP. In the present study, the differences between the click-induced and the skull-tap induced VEMP were studied in 18 patients at onset of vestibular neuritis. Gentle skull taps were delivered manually above each ear on the side of the skull and on the forehead midline. The muscular responses were recorded over both sternocleidomastoid muscles using skin electrodes. Abnormal skull tap VEMP were found in the majority of the patients (10/18, 56%). However, only 4/18 (22%) showed asymmetry in the click-induced VEMP. The high percentage of abnormal skull tap VEMP might suggest that this response is not only dependent on the inferior division of the vestibular nerve, because the inferior division of this nerve is usually spared in vestibular neuritis. Moreover, the patients with abnormals kull tap VEMP differed from those with normal VEMP in their settings of the subjective visual horizontal with static head tilt in the roll plane. This might suggest that skull tap VEMP are (also) related to utricular function. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
vestibular neuritis, sacculus, skull taps, VEMP, vestibulocollic, utriculus
in
Journal of Vestibular Research
volume
13
issue
2-3
pages
121 - 130
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:14757915
  • wos:000188378500007
  • scopus:0347091938
ISSN
1878-6464
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a7e6c634-1fc6-4510-ab3a-de765dbd38f7 (old id 288987)
alternative location
http://iospress.metapress.com/link.asp?id=0yc304p6cbkcfnyy
date added to LUP
2007-08-27 10:05:09
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:09:45
@article{a7e6c634-1fc6-4510-ab3a-de765dbd38f7,
  abstract     = {In recent years it has been demonstrated that loud clicks generate short latency vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP). It has also been demonstrated that skull tap stimulation evokes similar VEMP. In the present study, the differences between the click-induced and the skull-tap induced VEMP were studied in 18 patients at onset of vestibular neuritis. Gentle skull taps were delivered manually above each ear on the side of the skull and on the forehead midline. The muscular responses were recorded over both sternocleidomastoid muscles using skin electrodes. Abnormal skull tap VEMP were found in the majority of the patients (10/18, 56%). However, only 4/18 (22%) showed asymmetry in the click-induced VEMP. The high percentage of abnormal skull tap VEMP might suggest that this response is not only dependent on the inferior division of the vestibular nerve, because the inferior division of this nerve is usually spared in vestibular neuritis. Moreover, the patients with abnormals kull tap VEMP differed from those with normal VEMP in their settings of the subjective visual horizontal with static head tilt in the roll plane. This might suggest that skull tap VEMP are (also) related to utricular function.},
  author       = {Brantberg, K and Tribukait, A and Fransson, Per-Anders},
  issn         = {1878-6464},
  keyword      = {vestibular neuritis,sacculus,skull taps,VEMP,vestibulocollic,utriculus},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2-3},
  pages        = {121--130},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Journal of Vestibular Research},
  title        = {Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in response to skull taps for patients with vestibular neuritis},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2003},
}