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Implementation of physical coordination training and cognitive behavioural training interventions at cleaning workplaces - secondary analyses of a randomised controlled trial

Jorgensen, Marie B.; Faber, Anne; Jespersen, Tobias; Hansen, Klaus; Ektor-Andersen, John LU ; Hansen, Jorgen V.; Holtermann, Andreas and Sogaard, Karen (2012) In Ergonomics 55(7). p.762-772
Abstract
This study evaluates the implementation of physical coordination training (PCT) and cognitive behavioural training (CBTr) interventions in a randomised controlled trial at nine cleaners' workplaces. Female cleaners (n - 294) were randomised into a PCT, a CBTr or a reference (REF) group. Both 12-week interventions were performed in groups guided by an instructor. Records were kept on intervention dose (adherence) unanticipated events at the work place (context) and quality of intervention delivery (fidelity). Participant adherence was 37% in the PCT and 49% in the CBTr interventions. Optimal implementation was reached by only 6% in PCT and 42% in the CBTr. Analysis of the barriers to successful implementation indicated that the intervention... (More)
This study evaluates the implementation of physical coordination training (PCT) and cognitive behavioural training (CBTr) interventions in a randomised controlled trial at nine cleaners' workplaces. Female cleaners (n - 294) were randomised into a PCT, a CBTr or a reference (REF) group. Both 12-week interventions were performed in groups guided by an instructor. Records were kept on intervention dose (adherence) unanticipated events at the work place (context) and quality of intervention delivery (fidelity). Participant adherence was 37% in the PCT and 49% in the CBTr interventions. Optimal implementation was reached by only 6% in PCT and 42% in the CBTr. Analysis of the barriers to successful implementation indicated that the intervention process is sensitive to unanticipated events. In order to succeed in improving the health of high-risk populations such as cleaners and to correctly interpret intervention effects, more research on implementation is needed. Trial registration: ISRCTN96241850. Practitioner Summary: Both physical coordination training and cognitive behavioural training are potential effective workplace interventions among low educated job groups with high physical work demands. However, thorough consideration should be given to feasibility in the design of interventions. The optimal intervention should be tailored to closely match the implementation context and be robust and flexible to minimise susceptibility to changes in work organisation. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
context, feasibility, fidelity, adherence, participation
in
Ergonomics
volume
55
issue
7
pages
762 - 772
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000305557300005
  • scopus:84866872259
ISSN
0014-0139
DOI
10.1080/00140139.2012.665946
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b6d91b6a-9419-4a3d-a037-0845fd6b97df (old id 2890939)
date added to LUP
2012-08-01 08:54:32
date last changed
2017-01-01 04:02:40
@article{b6d91b6a-9419-4a3d-a037-0845fd6b97df,
  abstract     = {This study evaluates the implementation of physical coordination training (PCT) and cognitive behavioural training (CBTr) interventions in a randomised controlled trial at nine cleaners' workplaces. Female cleaners (n - 294) were randomised into a PCT, a CBTr or a reference (REF) group. Both 12-week interventions were performed in groups guided by an instructor. Records were kept on intervention dose (adherence) unanticipated events at the work place (context) and quality of intervention delivery (fidelity). Participant adherence was 37% in the PCT and 49% in the CBTr interventions. Optimal implementation was reached by only 6% in PCT and 42% in the CBTr. Analysis of the barriers to successful implementation indicated that the intervention process is sensitive to unanticipated events. In order to succeed in improving the health of high-risk populations such as cleaners and to correctly interpret intervention effects, more research on implementation is needed. Trial registration: ISRCTN96241850. Practitioner Summary: Both physical coordination training and cognitive behavioural training are potential effective workplace interventions among low educated job groups with high physical work demands. However, thorough consideration should be given to feasibility in the design of interventions. The optimal intervention should be tailored to closely match the implementation context and be robust and flexible to minimise susceptibility to changes in work organisation.},
  author       = {Jorgensen, Marie B. and Faber, Anne and Jespersen, Tobias and Hansen, Klaus and Ektor-Andersen, John and Hansen, Jorgen V. and Holtermann, Andreas and Sogaard, Karen},
  issn         = {0014-0139},
  keyword      = {context,feasibility,fidelity,adherence,participation},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {762--772},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Ergonomics},
  title        = {Implementation of physical coordination training and cognitive behavioural training interventions at cleaning workplaces - secondary analyses of a randomised controlled trial},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00140139.2012.665946},
  volume       = {55},
  year         = {2012},
}