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Isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength in individuals with hemiparesis after stroke

Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt LU ; Lexell, Jan LU and Brogårdh, Christina LU (2012) In Isokinetics and Exercise Science 20(2). p.91-97
Abstract
The aim of this study was to assess knee extensor and flexor muscle torque in individuals with hemiparesis after stroke and determine the relationship with muscle tone. Fifty individuals (mean age 58 +/- 6.4 years), 6 to 48 months after stroke, participated in the study. Maximal concentric knee extension and flexion torque at 60 degrees/s and 120 degrees/s and maximal eccentric knee extension contractions at 60 degrees/s were measured with a Biodex dynamometer. Muscle tone was assessed with the modified Ashworth Scale. The relative weakness in the paretic knee muscles ranged from 30% to 42% and was greater for the flexors and at higher velocities (p < 0.05). The knee flexion/extension torque ratio in the non-paretic lower limb was 0.53... (More)
The aim of this study was to assess knee extensor and flexor muscle torque in individuals with hemiparesis after stroke and determine the relationship with muscle tone. Fifty individuals (mean age 58 +/- 6.4 years), 6 to 48 months after stroke, participated in the study. Maximal concentric knee extension and flexion torque at 60 degrees/s and 120 degrees/s and maximal eccentric knee extension contractions at 60 degrees/s were measured with a Biodex dynamometer. Muscle tone was assessed with the modified Ashworth Scale. The relative weakness in the paretic knee muscles ranged from 30% to 42% and was greater for the flexors and at higher velocities (p < 0.05). The knee flexion/extension torque ratio in the non-paretic lower limb was 0.53 for both velocities and significantly lower (p < 0.01) for the paretic lower limb (0.44 at 60 degrees/s and 0.39 at 120 degrees/s). The eccentric/concentric ratio in the paretic lower limb (1.66) was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than in the non-paretic lower limb (1.31). Concentric torque in the paretic lower limb was significantly correlated (p < 0.05) with muscle tone. In conclusion, post-stroke weakness of the knee muscles was most prominent in the flexors and at higher velocities, whereas eccentric strength seemed to be preserved. Strength was also associated with the spasticity that can occur after stroke. This post-stroke muscle weakness pattern could be of importance for gait performance and should therefore be accommodated when planning rehabilitation interventions. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Stroke, muscle strength, muscle strength dynamometers, muscle tonus
in
Isokinetics and Exercise Science
volume
20
issue
2
pages
91 - 97
publisher
IOS Press
external identifiers
  • wos:000305152100004
  • scopus:84862996037
ISSN
1878-5913
DOI
10.3233/IES-2012-0446
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
b1adcd5d-4f0e-4706-b290-6fa39629ac53 (old id 2895768)
date added to LUP
2012-08-01 08:51:47
date last changed
2017-01-01 03:02:27
@article{b1adcd5d-4f0e-4706-b290-6fa39629ac53,
  abstract     = {The aim of this study was to assess knee extensor and flexor muscle torque in individuals with hemiparesis after stroke and determine the relationship with muscle tone. Fifty individuals (mean age 58 +/- 6.4 years), 6 to 48 months after stroke, participated in the study. Maximal concentric knee extension and flexion torque at 60 degrees/s and 120 degrees/s and maximal eccentric knee extension contractions at 60 degrees/s were measured with a Biodex dynamometer. Muscle tone was assessed with the modified Ashworth Scale. The relative weakness in the paretic knee muscles ranged from 30% to 42% and was greater for the flexors and at higher velocities (p &lt; 0.05). The knee flexion/extension torque ratio in the non-paretic lower limb was 0.53 for both velocities and significantly lower (p &lt; 0.01) for the paretic lower limb (0.44 at 60 degrees/s and 0.39 at 120 degrees/s). The eccentric/concentric ratio in the paretic lower limb (1.66) was significantly higher (p &lt; 0.05) than in the non-paretic lower limb (1.31). Concentric torque in the paretic lower limb was significantly correlated (p &lt; 0.05) with muscle tone. In conclusion, post-stroke weakness of the knee muscles was most prominent in the flexors and at higher velocities, whereas eccentric strength seemed to be preserved. Strength was also associated with the spasticity that can occur after stroke. This post-stroke muscle weakness pattern could be of importance for gait performance and should therefore be accommodated when planning rehabilitation interventions.},
  author       = {Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt and Lexell, Jan and Brogårdh, Christina},
  issn         = {1878-5913},
  keyword      = {Stroke,muscle strength,muscle strength dynamometers,muscle tonus},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {91--97},
  publisher    = {IOS Press},
  series       = {Isokinetics and Exercise Science},
  title        = {Isokinetic knee extension and flexion strength in individuals with hemiparesis after stroke},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/IES-2012-0446},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2012},
}