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Exploring the emerging knowledge base of 'the knowledge society'

Fagerberg, Jan LU ; Landström, Hans LU and Martin, Ben R. (2012) In Research Policy 41(7). p.1121-1131
Abstract
Science, technology and innovation have grown in importance over the last 50 years as we have moved towards a more knowledge-intensive society (the 'knowledge society'). A number of new research fields have emerged in an effort to understand these developments and to offer advice to decision-makers in government, industry and elsewhere. This special issue focuses on studies of three relatively distinct though thematically related research fields (innovation studies, entrepreneurship studies, and science and technology studies). The first three articles use a particular methodology based on analysis of the references cited in the chapters to authoritative 'handbooks' to identify the core contributions in the three fields. A fourth article... (More)
Science, technology and innovation have grown in importance over the last 50 years as we have moved towards a more knowledge-intensive society (the 'knowledge society'). A number of new research fields have emerged in an effort to understand these developments and to offer advice to decision-makers in government, industry and elsewhere. This special issue focuses on studies of three relatively distinct though thematically related research fields (innovation studies, entrepreneurship studies, and science and technology studies). The first three articles use a particular methodology based on analysis of the references cited in the chapters to authoritative 'handbooks' to identify the core contributions in the three fields. A fourth article examines the relationship between the core literatures in three fields and how this has evolved over time. Other articles look at the evolution of innovation studies as reflected in highly cited papers, at the development of entrepreneurship as seen by a key 'insider', and at the creation of new centres in these fields and the difficulties they face. The last article in this special issue shows how interdisciplinary centres in innovation studies suffer from research assessment systems that are intrinsically biased against interdisciplinary research. This introduction presents a synthesis of the articles in this special issue, discusses similarities and differences between the three fields and their development over time, and considers challenges for policy and governance arising from the research presented here. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Innovation studies, Entrepreneurship studies, Science and technology, studies, Knowledge society, New scientific fields
in
Research Policy
volume
41
issue
7
pages
1121 - 1131
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • wos:000305105700001
  • scopus:84861194367
ISSN
0048-7333
DOI
10.1016/j.respol.2012.03.007
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2c8e4b24-68fe-406a-8380-b9d82e1192d0 (old id 2895795)
date added to LUP
2012-07-26 10:48:12
date last changed
2017-07-09 04:00:17
@article{2c8e4b24-68fe-406a-8380-b9d82e1192d0,
  abstract     = {Science, technology and innovation have grown in importance over the last 50 years as we have moved towards a more knowledge-intensive society (the 'knowledge society'). A number of new research fields have emerged in an effort to understand these developments and to offer advice to decision-makers in government, industry and elsewhere. This special issue focuses on studies of three relatively distinct though thematically related research fields (innovation studies, entrepreneurship studies, and science and technology studies). The first three articles use a particular methodology based on analysis of the references cited in the chapters to authoritative 'handbooks' to identify the core contributions in the three fields. A fourth article examines the relationship between the core literatures in three fields and how this has evolved over time. Other articles look at the evolution of innovation studies as reflected in highly cited papers, at the development of entrepreneurship as seen by a key 'insider', and at the creation of new centres in these fields and the difficulties they face. The last article in this special issue shows how interdisciplinary centres in innovation studies suffer from research assessment systems that are intrinsically biased against interdisciplinary research. This introduction presents a synthesis of the articles in this special issue, discusses similarities and differences between the three fields and their development over time, and considers challenges for policy and governance arising from the research presented here. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Fagerberg, Jan and Landström, Hans and Martin, Ben R.},
  issn         = {0048-7333},
  keyword      = {Innovation studies,Entrepreneurship studies,Science and technology,studies,Knowledge society,New scientific fields},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {1121--1131},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Research Policy},
  title        = {Exploring the emerging knowledge base of 'the knowledge society'},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.respol.2012.03.007},
  volume       = {41},
  year         = {2012},
}