Advanced

Does culture influence pain-related parent behaviors?

Kristjánsdóttir, Ólöf LU ; McGrath, Patrick J. ; MacKinnon, Sean P. ; Kristjansdottir, Gudrun LU ; Siripul, Pulsuk ; Finley, G. Allen and Yoshida, Yoko (2018) In Canadian Journal of Pain 2(1). p.146-146
Abstract
Introduction/Aim: Studies suggest that cultural models of parenting (CMP) influence parental behaviors. Predominant cultural values are believed to inform the parenting styles caregivers adopt. Cultural values were expected to affect parental behaviors indirectly through parenting styles. We believed this would be moderated by ecosocial context. The present study aimed to examine cultural influences on pain-related parent-behaviors (PRPB). We hypothesized that ecosocial context would moderate the relationship between cultural values, parenting styles, and PRPB; and parenting styles would mediate the effect of cultural values on PRPB. Methods: A cross-cultural survey design was employed using a convenience sample of 547 caregivers of... (More)
Introduction/Aim: Studies suggest that cultural models of parenting (CMP) influence parental behaviors. Predominant cultural values are believed to inform the parenting styles caregivers adopt. Cultural values were expected to affect parental behaviors indirectly through parenting styles. We believed this would be moderated by ecosocial context. The present study aimed to examine cultural influences on pain-related parent-behaviors (PRPB). We hypothesized that ecosocial context would moderate the relationship between cultural values, parenting styles, and PRPB; and parenting styles would mediate the effect of cultural values on PRPB. Methods: A cross-cultural survey design was employed using a convenience sample of 547 caregivers of 6–12-year-olds living in Canada (n = 183), Iceland (n = 184), and Thailand (n = 180). The individualism-collectivism scale measured vertical
and horizontal individualism, and collectivism. The parenting styles and dimensions questionnaire measured authoritative, and authoritarian parenting styles. The inventory of parent/caregiver responses to the children’s pain experience scale measured solicitousness and discouraging.
Results: Multigroup structural equation modeling, showed that country did not affect which CMP caregivers adopted. Parenting styles mediated the relationship between cultural values and PRPB. Vertical/horizontal individualism, collectivism, and authoritative and authoritarian-parenting styles positively predicted solicitousness. Vertical individualism and authoritarian-parenting style positively predicted discouraging, whereas other predictors did not. Discussion/Conclusions: Unexpectedly, ecosocial context did not influence which CMP caregivers adopt, including their PRPB. As expected, parenting styles were mediators. Results supports others’ claims of solicitousness universality in a pediatric pain context. However, solicitousness may have different cultural meanings among individuals, and may be used in conjunction with discouraging.
(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
; ; ; ; ; and
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Canadian Journal of Pain
volume
2
issue
1
pages
1 pages
publisher
Taylor & Francis
ISSN
2474-0527
DOI
10.1080/24740527.2018.1476313
language
English
LU publication?
no
id
2924abcc-6c4e-4d62-8de9-ed122bd8ff6c
date added to LUP
2019-06-21 18:56:22
date last changed
2019-06-24 10:45:40
@misc{2924abcc-6c4e-4d62-8de9-ed122bd8ff6c,
  abstract     = {Introduction/Aim: Studies suggest that cultural models of parenting (CMP) influence parental behaviors. Predominant cultural values are believed to inform the parenting styles caregivers adopt. Cultural values were expected to affect parental behaviors indirectly through parenting styles. We believed this would be moderated by ecosocial context. The present study aimed to examine cultural influences on pain-related parent-behaviors (PRPB). We hypothesized that ecosocial context would moderate the relationship between cultural values, parenting styles, and PRPB; and parenting styles would mediate the effect of cultural values on PRPB. Methods: A cross-cultural survey design was employed using a convenience sample of 547 caregivers of 6–12-year-olds living in Canada (n = 183), Iceland (n = 184), and Thailand (n = 180). The individualism-collectivism scale measured vertical<br/>and horizontal individualism, and collectivism. The parenting styles and dimensions questionnaire measured authoritative, and authoritarian parenting styles. The inventory of parent/caregiver responses to the children’s pain experience scale measured solicitousness and discouraging.<br/>Results: Multigroup structural equation modeling, showed that country did not affect which CMP caregivers adopted. Parenting styles mediated the relationship between cultural values and PRPB. Vertical/horizontal individualism, collectivism, and authoritative and authoritarian-parenting styles positively predicted solicitousness. Vertical individualism and authoritarian-parenting style positively predicted discouraging, whereas other predictors did not. Discussion/Conclusions: Unexpectedly, ecosocial context did not influence which CMP caregivers adopt, including their PRPB. As expected, parenting styles were mediators. Results supports others’ claims of solicitousness universality in a pediatric pain context. However, solicitousness may have different cultural meanings among individuals, and may be used in conjunction with discouraging.<br/>},
  author       = {Kristjánsdóttir, Ólöf and McGrath, Patrick J. and MacKinnon, Sean P. and Kristjansdottir, Gudrun and Siripul, Pulsuk and Finley, G. Allen and Yoshida, Yoko},
  issn         = {2474-0527},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {05},
  note         = {Conference Abstract},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {146--146},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Canadian Journal of Pain},
  title        = {Does culture influence pain-related parent behaviors?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/24740527.2018.1476313},
  doi          = {10.1080/24740527.2018.1476313},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2018},
}