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Siberian wetlands: Where a sink is a source

Friborg, T; Soegaard, H; Christensen, Torben LU ; Lloyd, CR and Panikov, NS (2003) In Geophysical Research Letters 30(21).
Abstract
[1] A greenhouse gas inventory can for some ecosystems be based solely on the net CO2 exchange with the atmosphere and the export of dissolved organic carbon. In contrast, the global warming effect may be more complex in ecosystems where other greenhouse gases such as CH4 or N2O have significant exchanges with the atmosphere. Through micrometeorological landscape- scale measurements from the largest wetlands on Earth in West Siberia we show that CH4 has a stronger effect than CO2 on the greenhouse gas budget in terms of radiative forcing on the atmosphere. Direct measurements of the CO2 and CH4 exchange during the summer of 1999 show that these wetland ecosystems, on average, acted as net sinks of carbon of 0.5 g C m(-2) day(-1) but large... (More)
[1] A greenhouse gas inventory can for some ecosystems be based solely on the net CO2 exchange with the atmosphere and the export of dissolved organic carbon. In contrast, the global warming effect may be more complex in ecosystems where other greenhouse gases such as CH4 or N2O have significant exchanges with the atmosphere. Through micrometeorological landscape- scale measurements from the largest wetlands on Earth in West Siberia we show that CH4 has a stronger effect than CO2 on the greenhouse gas budget in terms of radiative forcing on the atmosphere. Direct measurements of the CO2 and CH4 exchange during the summer of 1999 show that these wetland ecosystems, on average, acted as net sinks of carbon of 0.5 g C m(-2) day(-1) but large net sources of CH4. Given the high Global Warming Potential of CH4, the Siberian wetlands are an important source of radiative forcing, even in comparison to anthropogenic emissions. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Geophysical Research Letters
volume
30
issue
21
publisher
American Geophysical Union
external identifiers
  • wos:000186652000002
  • scopus:1642316430
ISSN
1944-8007
DOI
10.1029/2003GL017797
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
41ee5951-870a-4279-9e0d-0bc15f7fa27a (old id 295099)
date added to LUP
2007-09-03 09:11:25
date last changed
2018-10-03 11:40:13
@article{41ee5951-870a-4279-9e0d-0bc15f7fa27a,
  abstract     = {[1] A greenhouse gas inventory can for some ecosystems be based solely on the net CO2 exchange with the atmosphere and the export of dissolved organic carbon. In contrast, the global warming effect may be more complex in ecosystems where other greenhouse gases such as CH4 or N2O have significant exchanges with the atmosphere. Through micrometeorological landscape- scale measurements from the largest wetlands on Earth in West Siberia we show that CH4 has a stronger effect than CO2 on the greenhouse gas budget in terms of radiative forcing on the atmosphere. Direct measurements of the CO2 and CH4 exchange during the summer of 1999 show that these wetland ecosystems, on average, acted as net sinks of carbon of 0.5 g C m(-2) day(-1) but large net sources of CH4. Given the high Global Warming Potential of CH4, the Siberian wetlands are an important source of radiative forcing, even in comparison to anthropogenic emissions.},
  author       = {Friborg, T and Soegaard, H and Christensen, Torben and Lloyd, CR and Panikov, NS},
  issn         = {1944-8007},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {21},
  publisher    = {American Geophysical Union},
  series       = {Geophysical Research Letters},
  title        = {Siberian wetlands: Where a sink is a source},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2003GL017797},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {2003},
}