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Long-term follow-up and consequences for severe road traffic injuries - treatment costs and health impairment in Sweden in the 1960s and the 1990s

Maraste, Pia LU ; Persson, Ulf LU and Berntman, Monica LU (2003) In Health Policy 66(2). p.147-158
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to provide information from two prospective long-term follow-ups for severe road traffic injuries in Sweden. The long-term consequences, in terms of loss of health and costs of care, are presented for severe injuries in Sweden in the early 1990s and are compared with information on injury severity and health care utilisation 25 years ago. The follow-up in the 1990s show that, I year after the accident 38%, of the non-fatal adults were suffering of some functional disability, pain and distress. Adults suffering from long-term loss of health decreased to 23% on average 3.7 years after the accident. The average health care cost was estimated to SEK46 200 (in 1995 prices), and the average in-patient care was 10... (More)
The purpose of this study is to provide information from two prospective long-term follow-ups for severe road traffic injuries in Sweden. The long-term consequences, in terms of loss of health and costs of care, are presented for severe injuries in Sweden in the early 1990s and are compared with information on injury severity and health care utilisation 25 years ago. The follow-up in the 1990s show that, I year after the accident 38%, of the non-fatal adults were suffering of some functional disability, pain and distress. Adults suffering from long-term loss of health decreased to 23% on average 3.7 years after the accident. The average health care cost was estimated to SEK46 200 (in 1995 prices), and the average in-patient care was 10 days. However, when also including subsequent expected life-long care for three severely injured patients, the average incidence-based health care cost was estimated to SEK100 300. In the 4-5 year follow-up 25 years ago, severe traffic injuries were treated on average 21 days in hospital and 38% of the adults were still suffering from long-term physical effects. Conclusions to be drawn are that treatment in hospital of severe traffic injuries has shortened by half and long-term consequences have not been worsened. Our results indicate that long-term effects do not cause as serious loss of health nowadays as they did 25 years ago. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
road traffic injuries, long-term follow-up, severity of the injury, loss of health, treatment costs
in
Health Policy
volume
66
issue
2
pages
147 - 158
publisher
Elsevier
external identifiers
  • pmid:14585514
  • wos:000186507800003
  • scopus:0142227053
ISSN
1872-6054
DOI
10.1016/S0168-8510(03)00021-6
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
beb50a79-839c-43b7-bfee-8ac7f9e51a4d (old id 296100)
date added to LUP
2007-09-18 07:12:33
date last changed
2018-10-03 11:28:27
@article{beb50a79-839c-43b7-bfee-8ac7f9e51a4d,
  abstract     = {The purpose of this study is to provide information from two prospective long-term follow-ups for severe road traffic injuries in Sweden. The long-term consequences, in terms of loss of health and costs of care, are presented for severe injuries in Sweden in the early 1990s and are compared with information on injury severity and health care utilisation 25 years ago. The follow-up in the 1990s show that, I year after the accident 38%, of the non-fatal adults were suffering of some functional disability, pain and distress. Adults suffering from long-term loss of health decreased to 23% on average 3.7 years after the accident. The average health care cost was estimated to SEK46 200 (in 1995 prices), and the average in-patient care was 10 days. However, when also including subsequent expected life-long care for three severely injured patients, the average incidence-based health care cost was estimated to SEK100 300. In the 4-5 year follow-up 25 years ago, severe traffic injuries were treated on average 21 days in hospital and 38% of the adults were still suffering from long-term physical effects. Conclusions to be drawn are that treatment in hospital of severe traffic injuries has shortened by half and long-term consequences have not been worsened. Our results indicate that long-term effects do not cause as serious loss of health nowadays as they did 25 years ago. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {Maraste, Pia and Persson, Ulf and Berntman, Monica},
  issn         = {1872-6054},
  keyword      = {road traffic injuries,long-term follow-up,severity of the injury,loss of health,treatment costs},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {147--158},
  publisher    = {Elsevier},
  series       = {Health Policy},
  title        = {Long-term follow-up and consequences for severe road traffic injuries - treatment costs and health impairment in Sweden in the 1960s and the 1990s},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0168-8510(03)00021-6},
  volume       = {66},
  year         = {2003},
}