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Accessibility and usability in housing: construct validity and implications for research and practice

Malmgren Fänge, Agneta LU and Iwarsson, Susanne LU (2003) In Disability and Rehabilitation 25(23). p.1316-1325
Abstract
Purpose: The aim of this study was to validate the conceptual definitions of accessibility and usability, and to explore differences between objective accessibility assessments and subjective ratings of usability in different client groups. Method: The Housing Enabler and the Usability in My Home instruments were used for 131 persons above 18 years of age, living in ordinary housing and receiving a housing adaptation grant. Covariation between accessibility in four different housing sections and three different usability aspects were explored, for the total sample and for six sub-samples reflecting person-environment-activity transactions or demographic factors. Results: Significant correlations were found in the total sample, among... (More)
Purpose: The aim of this study was to validate the conceptual definitions of accessibility and usability, and to explore differences between objective accessibility assessments and subjective ratings of usability in different client groups. Method: The Housing Enabler and the Usability in My Home instruments were used for 131 persons above 18 years of age, living in ordinary housing and receiving a housing adaptation grant. Covariation between accessibility in four different housing sections and three different usability aspects were explored, for the total sample and for six sub-samples reflecting person-environment-activity transactions or demographic factors. Results: Significant correlations were found in the total sample, among clients aged 75-84, women, clients living alone, as well as among clients with high dependence in personal and instrumental ADL and in outdoor activities. Subjective usability evaluations of activity aspects and physical environmental aspects were correlated to accessibility indoors and outdoors, while personal and social aspects of usability were correlated to outdoor accessibility. Conclusions: Accessibility and usability are concluded to be different but related concepts. The results indicate that e. g. age, civil status and ADL dependence affect how clients assess aspects of their housing situation. For efficient planning and evaluation of housing adaptations, assessment of housing accessibility, usability, and dependence in ADL is recommended. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Disability and Rehabilitation
volume
25
issue
23
pages
1316 - 1325
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000186547100004
  • pmid:14617438
  • scopus:1542397989
ISSN
0963-8288
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
799c75a7-c390-43a9-8c96-6cd18ce56a25 (old id 296153)
date added to LUP
2007-08-02 15:24:59
date last changed
2018-05-29 12:19:27
@article{799c75a7-c390-43a9-8c96-6cd18ce56a25,
  abstract     = {Purpose: The aim of this study was to validate the conceptual definitions of accessibility and usability, and to explore differences between objective accessibility assessments and subjective ratings of usability in different client groups. Method: The Housing Enabler and the Usability in My Home instruments were used for 131 persons above 18 years of age, living in ordinary housing and receiving a housing adaptation grant. Covariation between accessibility in four different housing sections and three different usability aspects were explored, for the total sample and for six sub-samples reflecting person-environment-activity transactions or demographic factors. Results: Significant correlations were found in the total sample, among clients aged 75-84, women, clients living alone, as well as among clients with high dependence in personal and instrumental ADL and in outdoor activities. Subjective usability evaluations of activity aspects and physical environmental aspects were correlated to accessibility indoors and outdoors, while personal and social aspects of usability were correlated to outdoor accessibility. Conclusions: Accessibility and usability are concluded to be different but related concepts. The results indicate that e. g. age, civil status and ADL dependence affect how clients assess aspects of their housing situation. For efficient planning and evaluation of housing adaptations, assessment of housing accessibility, usability, and dependence in ADL is recommended.},
  author       = {Malmgren Fänge, Agneta and Iwarsson, Susanne},
  issn         = {0963-8288},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {23},
  pages        = {1316--1325},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Disability and Rehabilitation},
  title        = {Accessibility and usability in housing: construct validity and implications for research and practice},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {25},
  year         = {2003},
}