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Porous protein-based scaffolds prepared through freezing as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.

Elowsson, Linda; Kirsebom, Harald; Carmignac, Virginie; Durbeej-Hjalt, Madeleine LU and Mattiasson, Bo (2012) In Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine 23(10). p.2489-2498
Abstract
Successful tissue engineering with the aid of a polymer scaffold offers the possibility to produce a larger construct and to mould the shape after the defect. We investigated the use of cryogelation to form protein-based scaffolds through different types of formation mechanisms; enzymatic crosslinking, chemical crosslinking, and non-covalent interactions. Casein was found to best suited for enzymatic crosslinking, gelatin for chemical crosslinking, and ovalbumin for non-covalent interactions. Fibroblasts and myoblasts were used to evaluate the cryogels for tissue engineering purposes. The stability of the cryogels over time in culture differed depending on formation mechanism. Casein cryogels showed best potential to be used in skeletal... (More)
Successful tissue engineering with the aid of a polymer scaffold offers the possibility to produce a larger construct and to mould the shape after the defect. We investigated the use of cryogelation to form protein-based scaffolds through different types of formation mechanisms; enzymatic crosslinking, chemical crosslinking, and non-covalent interactions. Casein was found to best suited for enzymatic crosslinking, gelatin for chemical crosslinking, and ovalbumin for non-covalent interactions. Fibroblasts and myoblasts were used to evaluate the cryogels for tissue engineering purposes. The stability of the cryogels over time in culture differed depending on formation mechanism. Casein cryogels showed best potential to be used in skeletal tissue engineering, whereas gelatin cryogels would be more suitable for compliable soft tissues even though it also seemed to support a myogenic phenotype. Ovalbumin cryogels would be better suited for elastic tissues with faster regeneration properties due to its faster degradation time. Overall, the cryogelation technique offers a fast, cheap and reproducible way of creating porous scaffolds from proteins without the use of toxic compounds. (Less)
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author
organization
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type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine
volume
23
issue
10
pages
2489 - 2498
publisher
Kluwer
external identifiers
  • wos:000309563000017
  • pmid:22772482
  • scopus:84867403442
ISSN
1573-4838
DOI
10.1007/s10856-012-4713-4
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3bb40ba7-e22f-49f0-ab80-b44c28374f0d (old id 2967365)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22772482?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-08-09 16:43:53
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:48:28
@article{3bb40ba7-e22f-49f0-ab80-b44c28374f0d,
  abstract     = {Successful tissue engineering with the aid of a polymer scaffold offers the possibility to produce a larger construct and to mould the shape after the defect. We investigated the use of cryogelation to form protein-based scaffolds through different types of formation mechanisms; enzymatic crosslinking, chemical crosslinking, and non-covalent interactions. Casein was found to best suited for enzymatic crosslinking, gelatin for chemical crosslinking, and ovalbumin for non-covalent interactions. Fibroblasts and myoblasts were used to evaluate the cryogels for tissue engineering purposes. The stability of the cryogels over time in culture differed depending on formation mechanism. Casein cryogels showed best potential to be used in skeletal tissue engineering, whereas gelatin cryogels would be more suitable for compliable soft tissues even though it also seemed to support a myogenic phenotype. Ovalbumin cryogels would be better suited for elastic tissues with faster regeneration properties due to its faster degradation time. Overall, the cryogelation technique offers a fast, cheap and reproducible way of creating porous scaffolds from proteins without the use of toxic compounds.},
  author       = {Elowsson, Linda and Kirsebom, Harald and Carmignac, Virginie and Durbeej-Hjalt, Madeleine and Mattiasson, Bo},
  issn         = {1573-4838},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {10},
  pages        = {2489--2498},
  publisher    = {Kluwer},
  series       = {Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine},
  title        = {Porous protein-based scaffolds prepared through freezing as potential scaffolds for tissue engineering.},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-012-4713-4},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2012},
}