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Are allergenic disperse dyes used for dyeing textiles?

Malinauskiene, Laura LU ; Zimerson, Erik LU ; Bruze, Magnus LU ; Morgardt-Ryberg, Kristina LU and Isaksson, Marléne LU (2012) In Contact Dermatitis 67(3). p.141-148
Abstract
Background:

There are no data showing that disperse dyes, used to patch test patients, are currently being used for dyeing synthetic garments. It is unknown whether disperse dyes, which are currently routinely patch tested, are in fact present in synthetic textiles on the market.



Objectives:

To determine whether eight disperse dyes, hitherto most widely cited as allergenic, are still used in textiles that are sold in various countries.



Methods:

Textiles from 13 countries in Europe, Asia and the United States were analysed. The procedure used for dye identification was thin-layer chromatography. When there were matching spots from the textile extract and reference dye,... (More)
Background:

There are no data showing that disperse dyes, used to patch test patients, are currently being used for dyeing synthetic garments. It is unknown whether disperse dyes, which are currently routinely patch tested, are in fact present in synthetic textiles on the market.



Objectives:

To determine whether eight disperse dyes, hitherto most widely cited as allergenic, are still used in textiles that are sold in various countries.



Methods:

Textiles from 13 countries in Europe, Asia and the United States were analysed. The procedure used for dye identification was thin-layer chromatography. When there were matching spots from the textile extract and reference dye, high-performance liquid chromatography was performed.



Results:

Of 121 analysed items, three showed positive results for some of the investigated disperse dyes. Four dyes in these items could be detected and confirmed by the use of high-performance liquid chromatography. A pair of light brown ladies' tights manufactured and purchased in Italy contained Disperse Yellow 3, Disperse Blue 124, and Disperse Blue 106, and a set of black bra and panties purchased in India contained Disperse Orange 1.



Conclusions:

The eight disperse dyes that are most frequently incriminated in textile dye dermatitis are very rarely used in textiles nowadays. (Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Contact Dermatitis
volume
67
issue
3
pages
141 - 148
publisher
Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd
external identifiers
  • wos:000307846500004
  • pmid:22748162
  • scopus:84865277101
ISSN
0105-1873
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02129.x
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3761fafd-728e-43dd-82d8-f35f0ba29a97 (old id 2967653)
alternative location
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22748162?dopt=Abstract
date added to LUP
2012-08-09 14:41:05
date last changed
2017-01-01 07:36:18
@article{3761fafd-728e-43dd-82d8-f35f0ba29a97,
  abstract     = {Background:<br/><br>
There are no data showing that disperse dyes, used to patch test patients, are currently being used for dyeing synthetic garments. It is unknown whether disperse dyes, which are currently routinely patch tested, are in fact present in synthetic textiles on the market. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Objectives:<br/><br>
To determine whether eight disperse dyes, hitherto most widely cited as allergenic, are still used in textiles that are sold in various countries. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Methods:<br/><br>
Textiles from 13 countries in Europe, Asia and the United States were analysed. The procedure used for dye identification was thin-layer chromatography. When there were matching spots from the textile extract and reference dye, high-performance liquid chromatography was performed. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Results:<br/><br>
Of 121 analysed items, three showed positive results for some of the investigated disperse dyes. Four dyes in these items could be detected and confirmed by the use of high-performance liquid chromatography. A pair of light brown ladies' tights manufactured and purchased in Italy contained Disperse Yellow 3, Disperse Blue 124, and Disperse Blue 106, and a set of black bra and panties purchased in India contained Disperse Orange 1. <br/><br>
<br/><br>
Conclusions:<br/><br>
The eight disperse dyes that are most frequently incriminated in textile dye dermatitis are very rarely used in textiles nowadays.},
  author       = {Malinauskiene, Laura and Zimerson, Erik and Bruze, Magnus and Morgardt-Ryberg, Kristina and Isaksson, Marléne},
  issn         = {0105-1873},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {141--148},
  publisher    = {Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd},
  series       = {Contact Dermatitis},
  title        = {Are allergenic disperse dyes used for dyeing textiles?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0536.2012.02129.x},
  volume       = {67},
  year         = {2012},
}