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Arthroscopic knee surgery does not modify hyperalgesic responses to heat injury

Werner, Mads LU ; Duun, P; Kraemer, O; Lassen, B and Kehlet, H (2003) In Anesthesiology 99(5). p.1152-1157
Abstract
Background: Experimental studies suggest that surgical injury may up- or down-regulate nociceptive function. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of elective arthroscopically assisted knee surgery on nociceptive responses to a heat injury. Methods: Seventeen patients scheduled to undergo repair of the anterior cruciate ligament and 16 healthy controls were studied. The first burn injury was induced 6 days before surgery, and the second burn was induced I day after surgery with a contact thermode (12.5 cm(2), 47degreesC for 7 min) placed on the medial aspect of the calf contralateral to the surgical side. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen were given for 2 days before the first burn injury and again from the time of... (More)
Background: Experimental studies suggest that surgical injury may up- or down-regulate nociceptive function. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of elective arthroscopically assisted knee surgery on nociceptive responses to a heat injury. Methods: Seventeen patients scheduled to undergo repair of the anterior cruciate ligament and 16 healthy controls were studied. The first burn injury was induced 6 days before surgery, and the second burn was induced I day after surgery with a contact thermode (12.5 cm(2), 47degreesC for 7 min) placed on the medial aspect of the calf contralateral to the surgical side. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen were given for 2 days before the first burn injury and again from the time of surgery. in the controls, the two burn injuries were separated by 7 days. Sensory variables included cumulated pain score during induction of the burn (visual analog scale), secondary hyperalgesia area, and mechanical and thermal pain perception and pain thresholds assessed before and I h after the burn injury. Results: The heat injuries induced significant increases in pain perception (P < 0.001) and decreases in pain thresholds (P < 0.02). Baseline heat pain thresholds were higher during the second burn injury in patients (P < 0.001) and controls (P < 0.01). However, there were no significant differences in pain to heat injury (P > 0.8), secondary hyperalgesia areas (P > 0.1), mechanical and thermal pain perception (P > 0.1), or mechanical and thermal pain thresholds (P > 0.08) in the burn area before surgery compared to after surgery. Conclusion: Arthroscopic knee surgery did not modify nociceptive responses to a contralaterally applied experimental burn injury. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Anesthesiology
volume
99
issue
5
pages
1152 - 1157
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
external identifiers
  • pmid:14576553
  • wos:000186239800022
  • scopus:0242332296
ISSN
1528-1175
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
6825b933-8db8-4f00-be72-b516f192fa70 (old id 297423)
alternative location
http://www.anesthesiology.org/pt/re/anes/abstract.00000542-200311000-00023.htm
date added to LUP
2007-09-24 07:51:52
date last changed
2018-01-07 06:10:59
@article{6825b933-8db8-4f00-be72-b516f192fa70,
  abstract     = {Background: Experimental studies suggest that surgical injury may up- or down-regulate nociceptive function. Therefore, the aim of this clinical study was to evaluate the effect of elective arthroscopically assisted knee surgery on nociceptive responses to a heat injury. Methods: Seventeen patients scheduled to undergo repair of the anterior cruciate ligament and 16 healthy controls were studied. The first burn injury was induced 6 days before surgery, and the second burn was induced I day after surgery with a contact thermode (12.5 cm(2), 47degreesC for 7 min) placed on the medial aspect of the calf contralateral to the surgical side. Ibuprofen and acetaminophen were given for 2 days before the first burn injury and again from the time of surgery. in the controls, the two burn injuries were separated by 7 days. Sensory variables included cumulated pain score during induction of the burn (visual analog scale), secondary hyperalgesia area, and mechanical and thermal pain perception and pain thresholds assessed before and I h after the burn injury. Results: The heat injuries induced significant increases in pain perception (P &lt; 0.001) and decreases in pain thresholds (P &lt; 0.02). Baseline heat pain thresholds were higher during the second burn injury in patients (P &lt; 0.001) and controls (P &lt; 0.01). However, there were no significant differences in pain to heat injury (P &gt; 0.8), secondary hyperalgesia areas (P &gt; 0.1), mechanical and thermal pain perception (P &gt; 0.1), or mechanical and thermal pain thresholds (P &gt; 0.08) in the burn area before surgery compared to after surgery. Conclusion: Arthroscopic knee surgery did not modify nociceptive responses to a contralaterally applied experimental burn injury.},
  author       = {Werner, Mads and Duun, P and Kraemer, O and Lassen, B and Kehlet, H},
  issn         = {1528-1175},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {1152--1157},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams & Wilkins},
  series       = {Anesthesiology},
  title        = {Arthroscopic knee surgery does not modify hyperalgesic responses to heat injury},
  volume       = {99},
  year         = {2003},
}