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Comparison of measured with calculated dose distribution from a 120-MeV electron beam from a laser-plasma accelerator

Lundh, Olle LU ; Rechatin, C.; Faure, J.; Ben-Ismail, A.; Lim, J.; De Wagter, C.; De Neve, W. and Malka, V. (2012) In Medical Physics 39(6). p.3501-3508
Abstract
Purpose: To evaluate the dose distribution of a 120-MeV laser-plasma accelerated electron beam which may be of potential interest for high-energy electron radiation therapy. Methods: In the interaction between an intense laser pulse and a helium gas jet, a well collimated electron beam with very high energy is produced. A secondary laser beam is used to optically control and to tune the electron beam energy and charge. The potential use of this beam for radiation treatment is evaluated experimentally by measurements of dose deposition in a polystyrene phantom. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 code. Results: It has been shown that the laser-plasma accelerated electron beam can deliver a peak dose of more... (More)
Purpose: To evaluate the dose distribution of a 120-MeV laser-plasma accelerated electron beam which may be of potential interest for high-energy electron radiation therapy. Methods: In the interaction between an intense laser pulse and a helium gas jet, a well collimated electron beam with very high energy is produced. A secondary laser beam is used to optically control and to tune the electron beam energy and charge. The potential use of this beam for radiation treatment is evaluated experimentally by measurements of dose deposition in a polystyrene phantom. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 code. Results: It has been shown that the laser-plasma accelerated electron beam can deliver a peak dose of more than 1 Gy at the entrance of the phantom in a single laser shot by direct irradiation, without the use of intermediate magnetic transport or focusing. The dose distribution is peaked on axis, with narrow lateral penumbra. Monte Carlo simulations of electron beam propagation and dose deposition indicate that the propagation of the intense electron beam (with large self-fields) can be described by standard models that exclude collective effects in the response of the material. Conclusions: The measurements show that the high-energy electron beams produced by an optically injected laser-plasma accelerator can deliver high enough dose at penetration depths of interest for electron beam radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors. Many engineering issues must be resolved before laser-accelerated electrons can be used for cancer therapy, but they also represent exciting challenges for future research. (C) 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.47199621 (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
laser-plasma accelerator, high energy electron radiotherapy
in
Medical Physics
volume
39
issue
6
pages
3501 - 3508
publisher
American Association of Physicists in Medicine
external identifiers
  • wos:000308905803006
  • scopus:84863535504
ISSN
0094-2405
DOI
10.1118/1.4719962
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
3e0c349e-0ec7-413b-bd11-944dd33d0e27 (old id 2991734)
date added to LUP
2012-08-22 13:07:56
date last changed
2017-08-06 04:14:39
@article{3e0c349e-0ec7-413b-bd11-944dd33d0e27,
  abstract     = {Purpose: To evaluate the dose distribution of a 120-MeV laser-plasma accelerated electron beam which may be of potential interest for high-energy electron radiation therapy. Methods: In the interaction between an intense laser pulse and a helium gas jet, a well collimated electron beam with very high energy is produced. A secondary laser beam is used to optically control and to tune the electron beam energy and charge. The potential use of this beam for radiation treatment is evaluated experimentally by measurements of dose deposition in a polystyrene phantom. The results are compared to Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 code. Results: It has been shown that the laser-plasma accelerated electron beam can deliver a peak dose of more than 1 Gy at the entrance of the phantom in a single laser shot by direct irradiation, without the use of intermediate magnetic transport or focusing. The dose distribution is peaked on axis, with narrow lateral penumbra. Monte Carlo simulations of electron beam propagation and dose deposition indicate that the propagation of the intense electron beam (with large self-fields) can be described by standard models that exclude collective effects in the response of the material. Conclusions: The measurements show that the high-energy electron beams produced by an optically injected laser-plasma accelerator can deliver high enough dose at penetration depths of interest for electron beam radiotherapy of deep-seated tumors. Many engineering issues must be resolved before laser-accelerated electrons can be used for cancer therapy, but they also represent exciting challenges for future research. (C) 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.47199621},
  author       = {Lundh, Olle and Rechatin, C. and Faure, J. and Ben-Ismail, A. and Lim, J. and De Wagter, C. and De Neve, W. and Malka, V.},
  issn         = {0094-2405},
  keyword      = {laser-plasma accelerator,high energy electron radiotherapy},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {3501--3508},
  publisher    = {American Association of Physicists in Medicine},
  series       = {Medical Physics},
  title        = {Comparison of measured with calculated dose distribution from a 120-MeV electron beam from a laser-plasma accelerator},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1118/1.4719962},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2012},
}