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Psychosocial factors, lifestyle, and fetal growth - The added value of both pre- and post-natal assessments

Dejin-Karlsson, E and Östergren, Per-Olof LU (2003) In European Journal of Public Health 13(3). p.210-217
Abstract
Background: Psychosocial resources as well as lifestyle habits during pregnancy have been shown to effect the risk of having a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) child. Most previous studies are based on a single assessment of these exposures, which does not take into account the possibility of different effects during early add late stages of pregnancy. Methods: The impact of psychosocial and lifestyle factors on the risk of giving birth to an SGA child (as measured by ultrasound) was examined among 747 nulliparous Swedish women who completed both a prenatal baseline, and a post-partum assessment. Results: Those registering low social participation on both assessments showed increased risk of giving birth to an SGA infant (OR=2.44 and 95%... (More)
Background: Psychosocial resources as well as lifestyle habits during pregnancy have been shown to effect the risk of having a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) child. Most previous studies are based on a single assessment of these exposures, which does not take into account the possibility of different effects during early add late stages of pregnancy. Methods: The impact of psychosocial and lifestyle factors on the risk of giving birth to an SGA child (as measured by ultrasound) was examined among 747 nulliparous Swedish women who completed both a prenatal baseline, and a post-partum assessment. Results: Those registering low social participation on both assessments showed increased risk of giving birth to an SGA infant (OR=2.44 and 95% CI: 1.06-5.66), while at one assessment (OR=1.70 and 95% CI: 0.74-3.91). Maternal smoking confirmed by both or one assessments yielded an OR=2.72 and 95% CI: 1.37-5.39 and OR=1.60 and 95% CI: 0.58-4.46, respectively. During early pregnancy, poor instrumental support, maternal smoking, or passive smoking yielded increased risks of SGA, adjusted for confounding (OR=2.39 and 95% CI: 1.11-5.17; OR=2.38 and 95% CI: 1.27-4.49; OR=2.92 and 95% CI: 1.17-7.32, respectively). In late pregnancy, only maternal smoking yielded a significant association (OR=2.34 and 95% CI: 1.24-4.41). Conclusion: Scheduling repeated assessments of psychosocial resources and lifestyle factors during pregnancy yielded additional information. The findings suggest that there can be differential effects of such exposures depending on gestational stage. This information is of importance when designing appropriate intervention strategies for maternal health services as well as for public health relevant policy formulation (e.g. regarding exposure to environmental tobacco during pregnancy). (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
maternal exposure, fetal growth retardation, pregnancy, psychosocial, deprivation, small for gestational age infant, risk assessment, support, social, tobacco smoke pollution
in
European Journal of Public Health
volume
13
issue
3
pages
210 - 217
publisher
Oxford University Press
external identifiers
  • pmid:14533722
  • wos:000185697700004
  • scopus:0141848651
ISSN
1101-1262
DOI
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
a6d48c32-9064-4ce6-b7ee-b98e809f182c (old id 299403)
date added to LUP
2007-08-29 11:31:17
date last changed
2018-05-29 10:41:33
@article{a6d48c32-9064-4ce6-b7ee-b98e809f182c,
  abstract     = {Background: Psychosocial resources as well as lifestyle habits during pregnancy have been shown to effect the risk of having a small-for-gestational-age (SGA) child. Most previous studies are based on a single assessment of these exposures, which does not take into account the possibility of different effects during early add late stages of pregnancy. Methods: The impact of psychosocial and lifestyle factors on the risk of giving birth to an SGA child (as measured by ultrasound) was examined among 747 nulliparous Swedish women who completed both a prenatal baseline, and a post-partum assessment. Results: Those registering low social participation on both assessments showed increased risk of giving birth to an SGA infant (OR=2.44 and 95% CI: 1.06-5.66), while at one assessment (OR=1.70 and 95% CI: 0.74-3.91). Maternal smoking confirmed by both or one assessments yielded an OR=2.72 and 95% CI: 1.37-5.39 and OR=1.60 and 95% CI: 0.58-4.46, respectively. During early pregnancy, poor instrumental support, maternal smoking, or passive smoking yielded increased risks of SGA, adjusted for confounding (OR=2.39 and 95% CI: 1.11-5.17; OR=2.38 and 95% CI: 1.27-4.49; OR=2.92 and 95% CI: 1.17-7.32, respectively). In late pregnancy, only maternal smoking yielded a significant association (OR=2.34 and 95% CI: 1.24-4.41). Conclusion: Scheduling repeated assessments of psychosocial resources and lifestyle factors during pregnancy yielded additional information. The findings suggest that there can be differential effects of such exposures depending on gestational stage. This information is of importance when designing appropriate intervention strategies for maternal health services as well as for public health relevant policy formulation (e.g. regarding exposure to environmental tobacco during pregnancy).},
  author       = {Dejin-Karlsson, E and Östergren, Per-Olof},
  issn         = {1101-1262},
  keyword      = {maternal exposure,fetal growth retardation,pregnancy,psychosocial,deprivation,small for gestational age infant,risk assessment,support,social,tobacco smoke pollution},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {210--217},
  publisher    = {Oxford University Press},
  series       = {European Journal of Public Health},
  title        = {Psychosocial factors, lifestyle, and fetal growth - The added value of both pre- and post-natal assessments},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2003},
}