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Virtuous carbon

Paterson, Matthew and Stripple, Johannes LU (2012) In Environmental Politics 21(4). p.563-582
Abstract
To provides an overall framework for thinking about the construction of carbon markets, we adopt James Der Derian's 'virtuous war' theory to develop an argument about carbon as a virtuous commodity. This refers to the close affinity between virtuality and virtue - the technological and the ethical - in the construction of carbon markets. The figure of virtuous carbon draws attention to both the fictitious character of carbon units (as imagined things, complex abstractions that exist only by way of agreement) and their virtue (how those units are only provisionally stabilised, and where their ethical contestation is part of their construction). We explore virtuality and virtue at five moments in the commodification of carbon (invention,... (More)
To provides an overall framework for thinking about the construction of carbon markets, we adopt James Der Derian's 'virtuous war' theory to develop an argument about carbon as a virtuous commodity. This refers to the close affinity between virtuality and virtue - the technological and the ethical - in the construction of carbon markets. The figure of virtuous carbon draws attention to both the fictitious character of carbon units (as imagined things, complex abstractions that exist only by way of agreement) and their virtue (how those units are only provisionally stabilised, and where their ethical contestation is part of their construction). We explore virtuality and virtue at five moments in the commodification of carbon (invention, proliferation, verification, and differentiation into two forms). Virtuous carbon thereby captures the emergence of a distinct sort of governmentality, which aims to neutralise resistance by imbuing the commodities of carbon markets with a self-evident moral quality. (Less)
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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
climate change, carbon markets, governmentality, virtue, virtuality, James Der Derian
in
Environmental Politics
volume
21
issue
4
pages
563 - 582
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000306315100002
  • scopus:84863911682
ISSN
0964-4016
DOI
10.1080/09644016.2012.688354
project
BECC
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
740b8d49-b8de-48cd-94b6-7660c1ab577a (old id 2994796)
date added to LUP
2012-08-22 10:44:45
date last changed
2017-08-06 03:21:21
@article{740b8d49-b8de-48cd-94b6-7660c1ab577a,
  abstract     = {To provides an overall framework for thinking about the construction of carbon markets, we adopt James Der Derian's 'virtuous war' theory to develop an argument about carbon as a virtuous commodity. This refers to the close affinity between virtuality and virtue - the technological and the ethical - in the construction of carbon markets. The figure of virtuous carbon draws attention to both the fictitious character of carbon units (as imagined things, complex abstractions that exist only by way of agreement) and their virtue (how those units are only provisionally stabilised, and where their ethical contestation is part of their construction). We explore virtuality and virtue at five moments in the commodification of carbon (invention, proliferation, verification, and differentiation into two forms). Virtuous carbon thereby captures the emergence of a distinct sort of governmentality, which aims to neutralise resistance by imbuing the commodities of carbon markets with a self-evident moral quality.},
  author       = {Paterson, Matthew and Stripple, Johannes},
  issn         = {0964-4016},
  keyword      = {climate change,carbon markets,governmentality,virtue,virtuality,James Der Derian},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {563--582},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Environmental Politics},
  title        = {Virtuous carbon},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09644016.2012.688354},
  volume       = {21},
  year         = {2012},
}