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The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) systematic overview of radiotherapy for cancer including a prospective survey of radiotherapy practice in Sweden 2001 - Summary and conclusions

Ringborg, U; Bergqvist, D; Brorsson, B; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva LU ; Ceberg, J; Einhorn, N; Frodin, JE; Jarhult, J; Lamnevik, G and Lindholm, C, et al. (2003) In Acta Oncologica 42(5-6). p.357-365
Abstract
A systematic assessment of radiotherapy for cancer was conducted by The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) and published in 1996. The assessment reviewed the scientific literature up to 1993 on the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of solid tumours. and estimated the costs associated with radiotherapy It also described the current practise of radiotherapy in Sweden 1992 and compared practise with scientific knowledge. The SBU has now conducted a follow-up study on radiotherapy for cancer, including a review of the scientific literature from 1994 and a prospective survey of radiotherapy practise in Sweden 2001. The following conclusions were drawn: The role of radiotherapy as an important form of treatment for... (More)
A systematic assessment of radiotherapy for cancer was conducted by The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) and published in 1996. The assessment reviewed the scientific literature up to 1993 on the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of solid tumours. and estimated the costs associated with radiotherapy It also described the current practise of radiotherapy in Sweden 1992 and compared practise with scientific knowledge. The SBU has now conducted a follow-up study on radiotherapy for cancer, including a review of the scientific literature from 1994 and a prospective survey of radiotherapy practise in Sweden 2001. The following conclusions were drawn: The role of radiotherapy as an important form of treatment for cancer with both curative and palliative intent has been further confirmed. The use of radiotherapy in Sweden has increased and is now at the internationally recommended level. Radiotherapy in Sweden is mostly given in accordance with the scientific evidence but may still be underutilized in certain situations. The resources for radiotherapy are being utilized more efficiently The costs of radiotherapy are still 5% of the total cost of cancer care, while the cost of an individual treatment (fraction) has decreased. The need for radiotherapy capacity will increase. In addition, half of the treatment equipment will have to be replaced in the next few years. (Less)
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publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
in
Acta Oncologica
volume
42
issue
5-6
pages
357 - 365
publisher
Taylor & Francis
external identifiers
  • wos:000185767900001
  • pmid:14596499
  • scopus:0141815531
ISSN
1651-226X
DOI
10.1080/02841860310010826
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
03cacf68-302d-4a55-a76b-db2eaf340f96 (old id 299520)
date added to LUP
2007-09-20 17:30:10
date last changed
2018-10-14 04:09:35
@article{03cacf68-302d-4a55-a76b-db2eaf340f96,
  abstract     = {A systematic assessment of radiotherapy for cancer was conducted by The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) and published in 1996. The assessment reviewed the scientific literature up to 1993 on the use of radiotherapy in the treatment of solid tumours. and estimated the costs associated with radiotherapy It also described the current practise of radiotherapy in Sweden 1992 and compared practise with scientific knowledge. The SBU has now conducted a follow-up study on radiotherapy for cancer, including a review of the scientific literature from 1994 and a prospective survey of radiotherapy practise in Sweden 2001. The following conclusions were drawn: The role of radiotherapy as an important form of treatment for cancer with both curative and palliative intent has been further confirmed. The use of radiotherapy in Sweden has increased and is now at the internationally recommended level. Radiotherapy in Sweden is mostly given in accordance with the scientific evidence but may still be underutilized in certain situations. The resources for radiotherapy are being utilized more efficiently The costs of radiotherapy are still 5% of the total cost of cancer care, while the cost of an individual treatment (fraction) has decreased. The need for radiotherapy capacity will increase. In addition, half of the treatment equipment will have to be replaced in the next few years.},
  author       = {Ringborg, U and Bergqvist, D and Brorsson, B and Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva and Ceberg, J and Einhorn, N and Frodin, JE and Jarhult, J and Lamnevik, G and Lindholm, C and Littbrand, B and Norlund, A and Nylen, U and Rosen, W and Svensson, H and Moller, TR},
  issn         = {1651-226X},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5-6},
  pages        = {357--365},
  publisher    = {Taylor & Francis},
  series       = {Acta Oncologica},
  title        = {The Swedish Council on Technology Assessment in Health Care (SBU) systematic overview of radiotherapy for cancer including a prospective survey of radiotherapy practice in Sweden 2001 - Summary and conclusions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02841860310010826},
  volume       = {42},
  year         = {2003},
}