Advanced

Protein Kinase C-γ and Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II-α Are Persistently Translocated to Cell Membranes of the Rat Brain during and after Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion

Matsumoto, Shohei; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Matsumoto, Eriko; Isshiki, Atsushi and Wieloch, Tadeusz LU (2004) In Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism 24(1). p.54-61
Abstract

The levels of protein kinase C-γ (PKC-γ) and the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II-α (CaMKII-α) were measured in crude synaptosomal (P2), particulate (P3), and cytosolic (S3) fractions of the neocortex of rats exposed to 1-hour and 2-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and 2-hour MCAO followed by 2-hour reperfusion. During MCAO, PKC levels increased in P2 and P3 in the most severe ischemic areas concomitantly with a decrease in S3. In the penumbra, PKCγ decreased in S3 without any significant increases in P2 and P3. Total PKC-γ also decreased in the penumbra but not in the ischemic core, suggesting that the protein is degraded by an energy-dependent mechanism, possibly by the 26S proteasome. The CaMKII-α levels increased... (More)

The levels of protein kinase C-γ (PKC-γ) and the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II-α (CaMKII-α) were measured in crude synaptosomal (P2), particulate (P3), and cytosolic (S3) fractions of the neocortex of rats exposed to 1-hour and 2-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and 2-hour MCAO followed by 2-hour reperfusion. During MCAO, PKC levels increased in P2 and P3 in the most severe ischemic areas concomitantly with a decrease in S3. In the penumbra, PKCγ decreased in S3 without any significant increases in P2 and P3. Total PKC-γ also decreased in the penumbra but not in the ischemic core, suggesting that the protein is degraded by an energy-dependent mechanism, possibly by the 26S proteasome. The CaMKII-α levels increased in P2 but not P3 during ischemia and reperfusion in all ischemic regions, particularly in the ischemic core. Concomitantly, the levels in S3 decreased by 20% to 40% in the penumbra and by approximately 80% in the ischemic core. There were no changes in the total levels of CaMKII-α during MCAO. The authors conclude that during and after ischemia, PKC and CaMKII-α are translocated to the cell membranes, particularly synaptic membranes, where they may modulate cellular function, such as neurotransmission, and also affect cell survival. Drugs preventing PKC and/or CaMKII-α translocation may prove beneficial against ischemic cell death.

(Less)
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
CaMKII, Cell death, Protein kinase C, Signal transduction, Stroke
in
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism
volume
24
issue
1
pages
8 pages
publisher
Nature Publishing Group
external identifiers
  • scopus:0347363880
ISSN
0271-678X
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2d9703f6-a4f1-489a-8cd1-6dc3a7b9b3ac
date added to LUP
2016-10-05 15:04:16
date last changed
2017-12-10 05:00:50
@article{2d9703f6-a4f1-489a-8cd1-6dc3a7b9b3ac,
  abstract     = {<p>The levels of protein kinase C-γ (PKC-γ) and the calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II-α (CaMKII-α) were measured in crude synaptosomal (P2), particulate (P3), and cytosolic (S3) fractions of the neocortex of rats exposed to 1-hour and 2-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and 2-hour MCAO followed by 2-hour reperfusion. During MCAO, PKC levels increased in P2 and P3 in the most severe ischemic areas concomitantly with a decrease in S3. In the penumbra, PKCγ decreased in S3 without any significant increases in P2 and P3. Total PKC-γ also decreased in the penumbra but not in the ischemic core, suggesting that the protein is degraded by an energy-dependent mechanism, possibly by the 26S proteasome. The CaMKII-α levels increased in P2 but not P3 during ischemia and reperfusion in all ischemic regions, particularly in the ischemic core. Concomitantly, the levels in S3 decreased by 20% to 40% in the penumbra and by approximately 80% in the ischemic core. There were no changes in the total levels of CaMKII-α during MCAO. The authors conclude that during and after ischemia, PKC and CaMKII-α are translocated to the cell membranes, particularly synaptic membranes, where they may modulate cellular function, such as neurotransmission, and also affect cell survival. Drugs preventing PKC and/or CaMKII-α translocation may prove beneficial against ischemic cell death.</p>},
  author       = {Matsumoto, Shohei and Shamloo, Mehrdad and Matsumoto, Eriko and Isshiki, Atsushi and Wieloch, Tadeusz},
  issn         = {0271-678X},
  keyword      = {CaMKII,Cell death,Protein kinase C,Signal transduction,Stroke},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {54--61},
  publisher    = {Nature Publishing Group},
  series       = {Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism},
  title        = {Protein Kinase C-γ and Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II-α Are Persistently Translocated to Cell Membranes of the Rat Brain during and after Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion},
  volume       = {24},
  year         = {2004},
}