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Diabetes Resolution and Work Absenteeism After Gastric Bypass : a 6-Year Study

Jönsson, E.; Ornstein, P.; Goine, H. and Hedenbro, J. L. LU (2017) In Obesity Surgery 27(9). p.2246-2252
Abstract

Background: Obesity-related diseases cause costs to society. We studied the cost of work absenteeism before and after gastric bypass and the effects of postoperative diabetes resolution. Patients and Methods: Data were obtained from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg) (national coverage >98%) and cross-matched with data from the Social insurance Agency (coverage 100%) for the period ±3 years from operation. In 2010, a total of 7454 bariatric surgeries were performed; the study group is 4971 unique individuals with an annual income of >10,750 Euros and complete data sets. A sex-, age-, and income-matched reference population was identified for comparison. Results: Patients with obesity had preoperatively a 3.5-fold... (More)

Background: Obesity-related diseases cause costs to society. We studied the cost of work absenteeism before and after gastric bypass and the effects of postoperative diabetes resolution. Patients and Methods: Data were obtained from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg) (national coverage >98%) and cross-matched with data from the Social insurance Agency (coverage 100%) for the period ±3 years from operation. In 2010, a total of 7454 bariatric surgeries were performed; the study group is 4971 unique individuals with an annual income of >10,750 Euros and complete data sets. A sex-, age-, and income-matched reference population was identified for comparison. Results: Patients with obesity had preoperatively a 3.5-fold higher absenteeism. During follow-up (FU), the ratio relative to the reference population remained constant. An increase of 12–14 net absenteeism days was observed in the first 3 months after surgery. Female sex (OR 1.5, CI 1.13–1.8), preoperative anti-depressant use (OR 1.5, CI 1.3–1.9), low income (OR 1.4, CI 1.2–1.8), and a history of sick leave (OR 1.004, CI 1.003–1.004) were associated with increased absenteeism during FU. Diabetes resolution did not decrease absenteeism from preoperative values. Conclusions: Patients with obesity have higher preoperative absenteeism than the reference population. Operation caused an increase the first 90 days after surgery of 12–13 days. There were no relative increases in absenteeism in the next 3 years; patients did not deviate from preoperative patterns but followed the trend of the reference population. Preoperative diabetes did not elevate that level during FU; diabetes resolution did not lower absenteeism.

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author
organization
publishing date
type
Contribution to journal
publication status
published
subject
keywords
Absenteeism, Benefits, Complications, Cost, Gastric bypass, Obesity, Sickness
in
Obesity Surgery
volume
27
issue
9
pages
2246 - 2252
publisher
Springer
external identifiers
  • scopus:85015167164
  • wos:000407971600005
ISSN
0960-8923
DOI
10.1007/s11695-017-2642-5
language
English
LU publication?
yes
id
2f035ac8-460b-4e90-9985-0d8c201a2f57
date added to LUP
2017-04-03 10:46:04
date last changed
2018-01-07 11:57:44
@article{2f035ac8-460b-4e90-9985-0d8c201a2f57,
  abstract     = {<p>Background: Obesity-related diseases cause costs to society. We studied the cost of work absenteeism before and after gastric bypass and the effects of postoperative diabetes resolution. Patients and Methods: Data were obtained from the Scandinavian Obesity Surgery Registry (SOReg) (national coverage &gt;98%) and cross-matched with data from the Social insurance Agency (coverage 100%) for the period ±3 years from operation. In 2010, a total of 7454 bariatric surgeries were performed; the study group is 4971 unique individuals with an annual income of &gt;10,750 Euros and complete data sets. A sex-, age-, and income-matched reference population was identified for comparison. Results: Patients with obesity had preoperatively a 3.5-fold higher absenteeism. During follow-up (FU), the ratio relative to the reference population remained constant. An increase of 12–14 net absenteeism days was observed in the first 3 months after surgery. Female sex (OR 1.5, CI 1.13–1.8), preoperative anti-depressant use (OR 1.5, CI 1.3–1.9), low income (OR 1.4, CI 1.2–1.8), and a history of sick leave (OR 1.004, CI 1.003–1.004) were associated with increased absenteeism during FU. Diabetes resolution did not decrease absenteeism from preoperative values. Conclusions: Patients with obesity have higher preoperative absenteeism than the reference population. Operation caused an increase the first 90 days after surgery of 12–13 days. There were no relative increases in absenteeism in the next 3 years; patients did not deviate from preoperative patterns but followed the trend of the reference population. Preoperative diabetes did not elevate that level during FU; diabetes resolution did not lower absenteeism.</p>},
  author       = {Jönsson, E. and Ornstein, P. and Goine, H. and Hedenbro, J. L.},
  issn         = {0960-8923},
  keyword      = {Absenteeism,Benefits,Complications,Cost,Gastric bypass,Obesity,Sickness},
  language     = {eng},
  month        = {03},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {2246--2252},
  publisher    = {Springer},
  series       = {Obesity Surgery},
  title        = {Diabetes Resolution and Work Absenteeism After Gastric Bypass : a 6-Year Study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11695-017-2642-5},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2017},
}